Skip to content

Smoking Cessation Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Find Your Smoking Triggers

By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

If you’re a smoker, you know the drill. Finish a meal and you suddenly feel a powerful craving for a cigarette. Get up from your desk to take a break and all at once you want to light up. Certain times of the day, certain places, and even particular foods can spark a strong urge to smoke.

Experts call these triggers. “For long-time smokers, daily life can be filled with triggers,” says Steven Schroeder, MD, director of the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center at the University of California, San Francisco.

Recommended Related to Smoking Cessation

E-Cigarettes Under Fire

"They are electronic, alternative smoking devices that simulate the sensation of smoking. They do not expose the user, or others close by, to harmful levels of cancer-causing agents and other dangerous chemicals normally associated with traditional tobacco products." -- Craig Youngblood, president of InLife, an e-cigarette company. "They are nicotine delivery devices intended to be used like a cigarette. What happens to someone who stops inhaling the tars of cigarettes and inhales only...

Read the E-Cigarettes Under Fire article > >

Drinking tea or coffee, sitting down to a cocktail or glass of wine, driving in the car, getting up during intermission at a concert, checking email, feeling bored, talking on the telephone -- all of them can trigger a powerful urge to smoke. Being angry or under stress can trigger a craving to smoke. But even positive feelings of happiness or pleasure can be triggers. 

Learn to Recognize Your Own Smoking Triggers

Triggers make it tough for smokers to quit. But once you recognize your own personal smoking triggers, you can use a few simple strategies to avoid or defuse them before they wear down your resolve. Before your quit date, keep a journal for several days or a week. Use a small notebook that you can easily carry with you. Every time you light a cigarette, record:

  • The time of day
  • How intense your craving feels (on a scale of 1 to 5)
  • What you’re doing at that moment
  • Where you are
  • Who you’re with
  • How you feel (happy, stressed, bored, etc.)

Be as precise in your notes as possible. Keep your journal for at least one weekday and one weekend day, since your routine is likely to be different on those days. Once you’re done, review your journal. Make a list of the most powerful triggers, based on the intensity of your craving. List the triggers that occur most frequently. Note places, people, situations, and moods that set off a craving to smoke.

Defuse Smoking Triggers in Advance

Triggers are a form of conditioned response. If you’re used to smoking a cigarette during a coffee break, for example, you begin to associate even the smell of coffee with smoking.

Today on WebMD

hands breaking a cigarette
Is quitting cold turkey an effective method?
ashtray
14 tips to get you through the first hard days.
 
smoking man
Surprising impacts of tobacco on the body.
cigarette smoke
What happens when you kick the habit?
 

Filtered cigarettes
ARTICLE
an array of e cigarettes
ARTICLE
 
human heart
ARTICLE
Woman experiencing withdrawal symptoms
ARTICLE
 

man smoking cigarette
ARTICLE
no smoking sign
VIDEO
 
Woman ashing cigarette in ashtray
ARTICLE
chain watch
ARTICLE