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Your Quit-Smoking Fears Debunked

Dreading the weight gain, bad mood, or chance of failure? Think again.
By Jennifer Nelson
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

You know you should quit smoking for your health's sake. So what's holding you back?

Maybe you’re afraid of the weight gain, that it will wreck your mood, or that it won't work. But what if that wasn't necessarily so?

Recommended Related to Smoking Cessation

How to Quit Smoking Like a Man

I started smoking when I was a bored and lonely 17-year-old irrigating alfalfa fields in Utah for money and reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance for enlightenment. I smoked watching magpies splash in the ditch, and for 20 years I kept sucking those nasty things for reasons of self-loathing and distraction, and mainly because I couldn’t stop. In 1996, just before my son was born, I put a lid on it. I wasn’t going to contaminate my babies with second-hand smoke. And it wasn't hard...

Read the How to Quit Smoking Like a Man article > >

It's time to lay your quit-smoking fears to rest once and for all. Here's what experts want you to know about why some of those fears aren't what they're cracked up to be, and why none of them should keep you from quitting.

Fear: I’ll Gain Too Much Weight

Many people worry about gaining weight when they quit smoking. But not everybody who quits gains weight.

“There are some physiological effects that cause people to crave carbohydrates when they quit smoking,” says Michael Steinberg, MD, MPH, director of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey’s Tobacco Dependence Program. “Nicotine is an appetite suppressant, so when people do stop smoking, they tend to have an increased appetite.”

But if you do pack on pounds, the average gain is between six to nine pounds-not the 50 or 100 that people fear.

Plus, you’d need to gain more than 100 pounds after quitting before you even start to diminish the benefits quitting provides for your health, Steinberg says.

Weight gain typically happens early on, in the days and weeks when you’re withdrawing from nicotine.

If you use a nicotine replacement therapy like the patch or the gum, you tend not to even see much of a weight gain during those early weeks, Steinberg says. And by the time you’ve withdrawn from the drug, you’re better able to tackle watching your weight a little more carefully.

If you’re still concerned, take steps to thwart weight gain by keeping your exercise routine up or launching a walking program. Stash only healthy snacks and replace empty-calorie carbs for healthier noshes like peanut butter on an apple or one ounce of cheddar with crackers.

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