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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Silent Stroke: What You Need to Know

    Is a silent stroke the same as a warning stroke? Find out how you can know if you’ve had a silent stroke, and learn what you can do to help prevent one.

  2. Stroke: Getting Dressed - Topic Overview

    A stroke often affects movement and use of one side of the body, so getting dressed is often difficult for people after a stroke.Getting dressed may be easier if you use stocking/sock aids, rings or strings attached to zipper pulls, and buttonhooks. Talk with a nurse or physical therapist about assistive devices that may help you get dressed. Clothing may be easier to put on if it has features such as:Velcro closures.Elastic waistbands and shoelaces.Snaps and grippers.To make getting dressed easier:Lay out your clothes in the order that you will put them on, with those you will put on first on top of the pile.Sit down while you dress.Put your affected arm or leg into the piece of clothing first, before the unaffected arm or leg.Removing clothing that has to go over your head may be difficult. To undress after a stroke has affected an arm or leg, remove the stronger arm or leg from the clothing first, then slip out your affected arm or leg.

  3. Stroke: Speech and Language Problems - Topic Overview

    Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. These problems may involve any or all aspects of language use, such as speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the spoken word. Speech and language problems (aphasia) usually occur when a stroke affects the right side of the body. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who has had a stroke, be patient, understanding, and supportive.The following are tips for helping someone who has speech and language problems:Speak directly to him or her—not to a companion, even if that person is an interpreter—and speak in second, not third, person: How are you feeling today?Maintain eye contact.Speak slowly and simply in a normal tone of voice. People who have speech and language problems are not deaf.Give him or her adequate time to respond.Listen carefully.Focus on what the person is saying, not how he or she is saying it.Don't fill in with a word or sentence unless you are asked.Ask the

  4. Driving a Car After a Stroke - Topic Overview

    You cannot drive after having a stroke until your doctor says that you can. This may be hard to accept. You may feel that this is a big loss of independence. But any problems with your vision, speech, or ability to move quickly after a stroke can change your ability to drive safely. You need your doctor's approval for the safety of yourself and others.After your doctor says that you can drive, talk to the motor vehicle department and ask about the rules for people who have had a stroke. You may need to take classes, be tested again, and have changes made to your car. Some stroke rehab centers give driver training classes.If you cannot drive because of problems from your stroke, check with your stroke rehab center about programs that offer special vans that can take you to and from places. Senior groups and volunteer agencies may also offer transportation services.

  5. Stroke: Your Rehabilitation Team - Topic Overview

    Rehabilitation after a stroke usually involves a number of health professionals. These may include the following people.Doctors and nursesRehabilitation doctor. The rehabilitation doctor is in charge of your medical care after a stroke. This may be a physiatrist (a doctor who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation), a neurologist, or a primary care doctor.Rehabilitation nurse. A rehabilitation nurse specializes in nursing care for people with disabilities. He or she can provide nursing care and helps doctors coordinate medical care. A rehabilitation nurse can also educate both you and your family about recovering from a stroke.Rehabilitation therapistsPhysical therapist. A physical therapist evaluates and treats problems with movement, balance, and coordination. The physical therapist can provide you with training and exercises to improve walking, getting into and out of bed or a chair, and moving around without losing your balance. The physical therapist also teaches

  6. Interactive Tool: What Is Your Risk for a Stroke if You Have Atrial Fibrillation? - Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Interactive tools are designed to help people determine health risks, ideal weight, target heart rate, and more. Stroke risk from atrial fibrillation ...

  7. Interactive Tool: What Is Your Risk for a Stroke if You Have Atrial Fibrillation? - What's next?

    Talk to your doctor about how to lower your risk of stroke if you have atrial fibrillation.You may be able to take medication or make lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking or changing your diet, that can reduce your chances of stroke. While warfarin offers the best protection against stroke, it can also cause serious bleeding and other problems. Some people cannot take warfarin because they

  8. Interactive Tool: What Is Your Risk for a Stroke if You Have Atrial Fibrillation? - What does your score mean?

    Your score will appear in values from 1% to 99%. If your score is 5%, it means that 5 out of 100 people with this level of risk will have a stroke in the next 5 years. If your score is 10%, it means that 10 out of 100 people with this level of risk will have a stroke in the next 5 years. These percentages are important because doctors often use them to determine whether a person should take the ..

  9. Interactive Tool: What Is Your Risk for a Stroke if You Have Atrial Fibrillation? - What does this tool measure?

    Click here if you have atrial fibrillation, are age 55 or older, and want to find your risk of stroke.This interactive tool measures the chance of having a stroke in the next 5 years for people with atrial fibrillation who are age 55 or older. The tool uses the information you enter to calculate your score. The calculation is based on information from the Framingham Heart Study. During the past ..

  10. Thrombolysis

    WebMD discusses thrombolysis for blood clots including types of treatment and their effects.

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