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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Problems - Topic Overview

    Some people who have a stroke suffer loss of bladder control (urinary incontinence) after the stroke. But this is usually temporary. And it can have many causes, including infection, constipation, and the effects of medicines.If you have problems controlling your bladder, your doctor may: Test a urine sample to see if you have an infection. Do tests to see how you urinate, which can help you and your doctor decide what treatment might work best for you.Help you develop a schedule of regular bathroom use that fits your abilities.Suggest that you wear protective clothing or a pad.Prescribe medicines, depending on the cause of your bladder problems.Some things you can do to prevent bladder leakage include:Emptying your bladder at regular intervals, including when you first wake up and at bedtime.Controlling your liquid intake, such as drinking liquids at regular intervals and limiting fluid intake after dinner.Urinary retentionYou may have trouble emptying your bladder completely

  2. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Rehabilitation

    After a stroke, you may need medicines to decrease pain, treat depression, or help speed your recovery. These may include: Medicines for pain and depression after a stroke. Examples are: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for pain and depression.Tricyclic antidepressants for pain and depression.Anticonvulsant medicines for pain.Medicines for sleeping. After a stroke, you may have ...

  3. Stroke Recovery: Coping With Eating Problems

    It is common to have trouble swallowing after a stroke (dysphagia). You may not be able to feel food on one or both sides of your mouth. You may have problems chewing or producing enough saliva, or you may have other conditions that make eating difficult and increase your risk of choking.Other things that may interfere with normal eating include:Problems seeing or judging where things are, ...

  4. Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs - Topic Overview

    After a stroke, you may not feel temperature, touch, pain, or sharpness on your affected side. You may have:Feelings of heaviness, numbness, tingling, or prickling or greater sensitivity on the affected side.No sense of how your muscles and joints are operating together, which may affect your balance.If you cannot feel an object, you may be more likely to hurt yourself.If you have a tendency to clench your fist on the affected arm, keep your fingernails short and smooth so that you do not cut yourself.If you cannot feel sensations in your feet, cut and file your toenails straight across so that you do not scratch yourself.Soaking your hands and feet may make your nails easier to cut. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about the care of your feet.If you cannot feel heat on your affected side, you may be more prone to burns. Tips to prevent burns include the following:Test the temperature of bath water or dishwater using your unaffected side.Bathe and do dishes in lukewarm

  5. Stroke - Symptoms

    If you have symptoms of a stroke, seek emergency medical care.

  6. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Prevention

    You can help prevent a transient ischemic attack (TIA) by controlling your risk factors for stroke.

  7. Topic Overview

    Is this topic for you?This topic covers rehabilitation after a stroke. For information on stroke itself, see the topic Stroke.What is stroke rehabilitation?The best way to get better after a stroke is to start stroke rehabilitation (“rehab”). In stroke rehab, a team of health professionals works with you to regain skills you lost as the result of a stroke. Rehab can help you to: Do as well and

  8. Stroke: Speech and Language Problems - Topic Overview

    Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. These problems may involve any or all aspects of language use, such as speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the spoken word. Speech and language problems (aphasia) usually occur when a stroke affects the right side of the body. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who has had a stroke, be patient, understanding, and supportive.The following are tips for helping someone who has speech and language problems:Speak directly to him or her—not to a companion, even if that person is an interpreter—and speak in second, not third, person: How are you feeling today?Maintain eye contact.Speak slowly and simply in a normal tone of voice. People who have speech and language problems are not deaf.Give him or her adequate time to respond.Listen carefully.Focus on what the person is saying, not how he or she is saying it.Don't fill in with a word or sentence unless you are asked.Ask the

  9. Stroke - Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems.

  10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

    What is a transient ischemic attack (TIA)? Some people call a transient ischemic attack (TIA) a mini - stroke, because the symptoms are like those of a stroke but do not last long.

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