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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Stroke Guide - Home Treatment

    After a stroke, home treatment will be an important part of your rehabilitation.You may need to use assistive devices to help you eat, get dressed, and walk.

  2. Stroke: Hesitant or Impulsive? - Topic Overview

    Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

  3. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Rehabilitation

    After a stroke, you may need medicines to decrease pain, treat depression, or help speed your recovery. These may include: Medicines for pain and depression after a stroke. Examples are: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for pain and depression.Tricyclic antidepressants for pain and depression.Anticonvulsant medicines for pain.Medicines for sleeping. After a stroke, you may have ...

  4. Stroke Guide - What Happens

    When you have an ischemic stroke, the oxygen-rich blood supply to part of your brain is reduced. With a hemorrhagic stroke, there is bleeding in the brain. After about 4 minutes without blood and oxygen, brain cells become damaged and may die.

  5. Stroke - Topic Overview

    What is a stroke? A stroke occurs when a blood vessel (artery) that supplies blood to the brain bursts or is blocked by a blood clot. Within minutes, the nerve cells in that area of the brain are damaged, and they may die within a few hours.

  6. Smoking and Stroke Risk - Topic Overview

    Smoking injures blood vessel walls and speeds up hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). As a result, the heart works harder, and blood pressure may increase. Cigarette smoking increases your risk for transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke.Heavy smokers are at greater risk for TIA and stroke. Daily cigarette smoking can increase the risk of stroke by 2½ times.1The risk of stroke and TIA decreases for those who quit smoking. If you smoked less than one pack a day and you quit, within 5 years your risk will be the same as though you had never smoked.1

  7. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Depression and Pain After a Stroke

    Drug details for Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression and pain after a stroke.

  8. Stroke Rehabilitation - What to Expect After a Stroke

    Initial disabilitiesYour disabilities and your ability to get better after a stroke depend on: Which side of the brain was affected (whether it is your dominant side).Which part of the brain was damaged by the stroke.How much of the brain was damaged.Your general health before the stroke.Disabilities after a stroke may include problems with muscles and movement. These include:Weakness on one side

  9. Stroke: Speech and Language Problems - Topic Overview

    Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. These problems may involve any or all aspects of language use, such as speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the spoken word. Speech and language problems (aphasia) usually occur when a stroke affects the right side of the body. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who has had a stroke, be patient, understanding, and supportive.The following are tips for helping someone who has speech and language problems:Speak directly to him or her—not to a companion, even if that person is an interpreter—and speak in second, not third, person: How are you feeling today?Maintain eye contact.Speak slowly and simply in a normal tone of voice. People who have speech and language problems are not deaf.Give him or her adequate time to respond.Listen carefully.Focus on what the person is saying, not how he or she is saying it.Don't fill in with a word or sentence unless you are asked.Ask the

  10. Stroke Rehabilitation - Preventing Another Stroke

    There are several factors you cannot change that increase your risk of stroke. But there are also several things that you have some control over which can help you avoid another stroke, including:High blood pressure.Heart disease.High cholesterol.Diabetes.Obesity.Excessive use of alcohol.Use of tobacco products.Too much caffeine.Use of certain illegal drugs, such as cocaine.To prevent another ...

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