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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Stroke Guide - Other Treatment

    Stroke rehabilitation is a critical part of a successful recovery. Half of the people who have a stroke lose some of their independence, and 20% are completely dependent on others for their care.

  2. Stroke - Symptoms

    If you have symptoms of a stroke, seek emergency medical care.

  3. Stroke Rehabilitation - Concerns of the Caregiver

    Taking care of a loved one who has had a stroke can be difficult for many reasons. You may be afraid that your loved one will have another stroke or will not be able to accept or overcome disabilities. You may worry that you are not prepared to care for someone who has just had a stroke, or you may have your own health concerns that make it difficult for you to care for another person. You may ...

  4. Stroke Guide - Cause

    An ischemic stroke is caused by a blood clot that blocks blood flow to the brain.

  5. Exercising to Prevent a Stroke - Topic Overview

    Exercise helps lower high blood pressure,which is an important risk factor for stroke. Exercise can help you control other things that put you at risk,such as obesity,high cholesterol and diabetes. It is important to exercise regularly. Do activities that raise your heart rate. Try to do at least 2½ hours a week of moderate exercise. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day,...

  6. Stroke Recovery: Coping With Eating Problems

    It is common to have trouble swallowing after a stroke (dysphagia). You may not be able to feel food on one or both sides of your mouth. You may have problems chewing or producing enough saliva, or you may have other conditions that make eating difficult and increase your risk of choking.Other things that may interfere with normal eating include:Problems seeing or judging where things are, ...

  7. Stroke and TIA: Who Is Affected - Topic Overview

    About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

  8. Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs - Topic Overview

    After a stroke, you may not feel temperature, touch, pain, or sharpness on your affected side. You may have:Feelings of heaviness, numbness, tingling, or prickling or greater sensitivity on the affected side.No sense of how your muscles and joints are operating together, which may affect your balance.If you cannot feel an object, you may be more likely to hurt yourself.If you have a tendency to clench your fist on the affected arm, keep your fingernails short and smooth so that you do not cut yourself.If you cannot feel sensations in your feet, cut and file your toenails straight across so that you do not scratch yourself.Soaking your hands and feet may make your nails easier to cut. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about the care of your feet.If you cannot feel heat on your affected side, you may be more prone to burns. Tips to prevent burns include the following:Test the temperature of bath water or dishwater using your unaffected side.Bathe and do dishes in lukewarm

  9. Stroke Guide - What Increases Your Risk

    Read about diseases or conditions that may make stroke more likely.

  10. Stroke - Topic Overview

    What is a stroke? A stroke occurs when a blood vessel (artery) that supplies blood to the brain bursts or is blocked by a blood clot. Within minutes, the nerve cells in that area of the brain are damaged, and they may die within a few hours.

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