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    Stroke Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Stroke

    1. Stroke - Cause

      Blood clots that temporarily block blood flow to the brain are the most common cause of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

    2. Stroke Guide - Exams and Tests

      Time is critical when diagnosing a stroke. A quick diagnosis within the first 3 hours may enable your doctor to use medications that can lead to a better recovery. The first priority will be to determine whether you are having an ischemic or hemorrhagic s

    3. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Prevention

      For some people, stroke prevention may begin after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) - a warning sign that a stroke may soon occur. Prompt medical attention may help prevent a stroke.

    4. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people who have had a stroke have problems seeing in some or all of the normal areas of vision. For example, people with left-sided paralysis may have difficulty seeing to the left. If the problem is due to a vision loss, most people learn to make up for this loss by turning their heads. If the person does not turn his or her head to the affected side, that side of the body may be ignored or neglected.Caregivers may notice signs that the person is ignoring the affected side, such as:Mentioning or responding to stimulation only on the unaffected side of the body.Using only the unaffected arm or leg.Looking only to the environment on the unaffected side.Noticing only someone who speaks or approaches from the unaffected side of the body.Responding to only half of the objects he or she would normally see, such as eating from just one side of the plate.Not recognizing the affected arm and leg as belonging to his or her body and thinking that they belong to someone else.Thinking that

    5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. These problems may involve any or all aspects of language use, such as speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the spoken word. Speech and language problems (aphasia) usually occur when a stroke affects the right side of the body. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who has had a stroke, be patient, understanding, and supportive.The following are tips for helping someone who has speech and language problems:Speak directly to him or her—not to a companion, even if that person is an interpreter—and speak in second, not third, person: How are you feeling today?Maintain eye contact.Speak slowly and simply in a normal tone of voice. People who have speech and language problems are not deaf.Give him or her adequate time to respond.Listen carefully.Focus on what the person is saying, not how he or she is saying it.Don't fill in with a word or sentence unless you are asked.Ask the

    6. Stroke - Topic Overview

      Complications that threaten a person's life may develop soon after stroke symptoms occur. Preventing these complications is a major focus of initial stroke treatment. Life-threatening complications include: Increased pressure on the brain,which develops when the brain swells after a large stroke. Such swelling occurs quickly,becomes most severe within 3 to 5 days after the stroke,and can ...

    7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      A hemorrhagic stroke develops when a blood vessel (artery) in the brain leaks or bursts (ruptures). This causes bleeding: Inside the brain tissue (intracerebral hemorrhage). Near the surface of the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage or subdural hemorrhage ). A common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage is the rupture of an aneurysm. Hemorrhagic strokes are not as common as strokes caused by a blood ...

    8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

    9. Stroke Guide - Cause

      An ischemic stroke is caused by a blood clot that blocks blood flow to the brain.

    10. Angiogram of the Head and Neck

      Angiogram of the head and neck is an X-ray test that uses fluoroscopy to take pictures of the blood flow within the blood vessels of the head and neck.

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