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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Medicines for Stroke Rehabilitation

    After a stroke, you may need medicines to decrease pain, treat depression, or help speed your recovery. These may include: Medicines for pain and depression after a stroke. Examples are: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for pain and depression.Tricyclic antidepressants for pain and depression.Anticonvulsant medicines for pain.Medicines for sleeping. After a stroke, you may have ...

  2. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

    About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

  3. Exercising to Prevent a Stroke - Topic Overview

    Exercise helps lower high blood pressure,which is an important risk factor for stroke. Exercise can help you control other things that put you at risk,such as obesity,high cholesterol and diabetes. It is important to exercise regularly. Do activities that raise your heart rate. Try to do at least 2½ hours a week of moderate exercise. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day,...

  4. Stroke - Concerns of the Caregiver

    Taking care of a loved one who has had a stroke can be difficult for many reasons. You may be afraid that your loved one will have another stroke or will not be able to accept or overcome disabilities. You may worry that you are not prepared to care for someone who has just had a stroke, or you may have your own health concerns that make it difficult for you to care for another person. You may ...

  5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

    Smoking injures blood vessel walls and speeds up hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). As a result, the heart works harder, and blood pressure may increase. Cigarette smoking increases your risk for transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke.Heavy smokers are at greater risk for TIA and stroke. Daily cigarette smoking can increase the risk of stroke by 2½ times.1The risk of stroke and TIA decreases for those who quit smoking. If you smoked less than one pack a day and you quit, within 5 years your risk will be the same as though you had never smoked.1

  6. Stroke Guide - Exams and Tests

    Time is critical when diagnosing a stroke. A quick diagnosis within the first 3 hours may enable your doctor to use medications that can lead to a better recovery. The first priority will be to determine whether you are having an ischemic or hemorrhagic s

  7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

    Some people have speech and language problems after a stroke. These problems may involve any or all aspects of language use, such as speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the spoken word. Speech and language problems (aphasia) usually occur when a stroke affects the right side of the body. Trouble communicating can be very frustrating. When you talk to someone who has had a stroke, be patient, understanding, and supportive.The following are tips for helping someone who has speech and language problems:Speak directly to him or her—not to a companion, even if that person is an interpreter—and speak in second, not third, person: How are you feeling today?Maintain eye contact.Speak slowly and simply in a normal tone of voice. People who have speech and language problems are not deaf.Give him or her adequate time to respond.Listen carefully.Focus on what the person is saying, not how he or she is saying it.Don't fill in with a word or sentence unless you are asked.Ask the

  8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Exams and Tests

    Read about exams and tests doctors use to diagnose transient ischemic attack (TIA).

  9. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

    Some people who have a stroke suffer loss of bladder control (urinary incontinence) after the stroke. But this is usually temporary. And it can have many causes, including infection, constipation, and the effects of medicines.If you have problems controlling your bladder, your doctor may: Test a urine sample to see if you have an infection. Do tests to see how you urinate, which can help you and your doctor decide what treatment might work best for you.Help you develop a schedule of regular bathroom use that fits your abilities.Suggest that you wear protective clothing or a pad.Prescribe medicines, depending on the cause of your bladder problems.Some things you can do to prevent bladder leakage include:Emptying your bladder at regular intervals, including when you first wake up and at bedtime.Controlling your liquid intake, such as drinking liquids at regular intervals and limiting fluid intake after dinner.Urinary retentionYou may have trouble emptying your bladder completely

  10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems.

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