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    Stroke Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Stroke

    1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people who have a stroke suffer loss of bladder control (urinary incontinence) after the stroke. But this is usually temporary. And it can have many causes, including infection, constipation, and the effects of medicines.If you have problems controlling your bladder, your doctor may: Test a urine sample to see if you have an infection. Do tests to see how you urinate, which can help you and your doctor decide what treatment might work best for you.Help you develop a schedule of regular bathroom use that fits your abilities.Suggest that you wear protective clothing or a pad.Prescribe medicines, depending on the cause of your bladder problems.Some things you can do to prevent bladder leakage include:Emptying your bladder at regular intervals, including when you first wake up and at bedtime.Controlling your liquid intake, such as drinking liquids at regular intervals and limiting fluid intake after dinner.Urinary retentionYou may have trouble emptying your bladder completely

    2. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Symptoms

      Learn the symptoms of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

    3. Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs - Topic Overview

      Is this topic for you?This topic covers rehabilitation after a stroke. For information on stroke itself, see the topic Stroke.What is stroke rehabilitation?The best way to get better after a stroke is to start stroke rehabilitation (“rehab”). In stroke rehab, a team of health professionals works with you to regain skills you lost as the result of a stroke. Rehab can help you to: Do as well and

    4. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Depression and Pain After a Stroke

      Drug details for Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression and pain after a stroke.

    5. Stroke - Concerns of the Caregiver

      Taking care of a loved one who has had a stroke can be difficult for many reasons. You may be afraid that your loved one will have another stroke or will not be able to accept or overcome disabilities. You may worry that you are not prepared to care for someone who has just had a stroke, or you may have your own health concerns that make it difficult for you to care for another person. You may ...

    6. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

    7. Stroke Guide - What Increases Your Risk

      Read about diseases or conditions that may make stroke more likely.

    8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      When a stroke occurs on the right side of the brain,a person's ability to judge distance,size,position,rate of movement,form,and the way parts relate to the whole is affected (spatial-perceptual problems). People with these problems may have more trouble learning to care for themselves. Signs of perception problems are often noticed by the caregiver of a person who has had a stroke. ...

    9. Stroke: Preventing Injury in Affected Limbs - Topic Overview

      After a stroke, you may not feel temperature, touch, pain, or sharpness on your affected side. You may have:Feelings of heaviness, numbness, tingling, or prickling or greater sensitivity on the affected side.No sense of how your muscles and joints are operating together, which may affect your balance.If you cannot feel an object, you may be more likely to hurt yourself.If you have a tendency to clench your fist on the affected arm, keep your fingernails short and smooth so that you do not cut yourself.If you cannot feel sensations in your feet, cut and file your toenails straight across so that you do not scratch yourself.Soaking your hands and feet may make your nails easier to cut. If you have diabetes, talk with your doctor about the care of your feet.If you cannot feel heat on your affected side, you may be more prone to burns. Tips to prevent burns include the following:Test the temperature of bath water or dishwater using your unaffected side.Bathe and do dishes in lukewarm

    10. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Smoking injures blood vessel walls and speeds up hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). As a result, the heart works harder, and blood pressure may increase. Cigarette smoking increases your risk for transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke.Heavy smokers are at greater risk for TIA and stroke. Daily cigarette smoking can increase the risk of stroke by 2½ times.1The risk of stroke and TIA decreases for those who quit smoking. If you smoked less than one pack a day and you quit, within 5 years your risk will be the same as though you had never smoked.1

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