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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Driving a Car After a Stroke - Topic Overview

    You cannot drive after having a stroke until your doctor says that you can. This may be hard to accept. You may feel that this is a big loss of independence. But any problems with your vision, speech, or ability to move quickly after a stroke can change your ability to drive safely. You need your doctor's approval for the safety of yourself and others.After your doctor says that you can drive, talk to the motor vehicle department and ask about the rules for people who have had a stroke. You may need to take classes, be tested again, and have changes made to your car. Some stroke rehab centers give driver training classes.If you cannot drive because of problems from your stroke, check with your stroke rehab center about programs that offer special vans that can take you to and from places. Senior groups and volunteer agencies may also offer transportation services.

  2. Antiplatelet Medicines for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

    Drug details for Antiplatelets for stroke and TIA.

  3. Stroke Guide - What Increases Your Risk

    Read about diseases or conditions that may make stroke more likely.

  4. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - What Increases Your Risk

    The risk factors for a transient ischemic attack (TIA) are the same as those for a stroke.

  5. Stroke: Problems With Ignoring the Affected Side - Topic Overview

    Some people who have had a stroke have problems seeing in some or all of the normal areas of vision. For example, people with left-sided paralysis may have difficulty seeing to the left. If the problem is due to a vision loss, most people learn to make up for this loss by turning their heads. If the person does not turn his or her head to the affected side, that side of the body may be ignored or neglected.Caregivers may notice signs that the person is ignoring the affected side, such as:Mentioning or responding to stimulation only on the unaffected side of the body.Using only the unaffected arm or leg.Looking only to the environment on the unaffected side.Noticing only someone who speaks or approaches from the unaffected side of the body.Responding to only half of the objects he or she would normally see, such as eating from just one side of the plate.Not recognizing the affected arm and leg as belonging to his or her body and thinking that they belong to someone else.Thinking that

  6. Stroke Guide - What Happens

    When you have an ischemic stroke, the oxygen-rich blood supply to part of your brain is reduced. With a hemorrhagic stroke, there is bleeding in the brain. After about 4 minutes without blood and oxygen, brain cells become damaged and may die.

  7. Stroke: Changes in Emotions - Topic Overview

    Emotional reactions after a stroke may be different from normal emotional reactions.The reaction may have little or no obvious connection with what is happening around the person.Often reactions can be easily interrupted by diverting the person's attention.People who have had a stroke—usually in the front part of the brain or in the brain stem—can lose emotional control and may switch from crying to laughing for no apparent reason.Crying appears to be the most frequent problem. Crying can be a symptom of depression, which is a medical condition that requires treatment. Untreated depression can interfere with recovery. And it can have a significant impact on enjoyment of life. Medicine may be needed to help control emotional responses and treat depression. People who have had a stroke may act differently because they feel isolated and have vision problems. They may:Become irritable, confused, or restless.Sometimes have false beliefs (delusions).Have hallucinations.This is more

  8. Stroke: Memory Tips - Topic Overview

    A stroke often causes memory problems. If your family member has problems with memory: Set a daily routine,if possible. Warn the person about upcoming changes in routine. Someone who has had a stroke may be very sensitive to minor changes in the daily activities. Give short instructions. People with memory problems can remember only small amounts of information at a time (short retention ...

  9. Stroke Rehabilitation - What to Expect After a Stroke

    Initial disabilitiesYour disabilities and your ability to get better after a stroke depend on: Which side of the brain was affected (whether it is your dominant side).Which part of the brain was damaged by the stroke.How much of the brain was damaged.Your general health before the stroke.Disabilities after a stroke may include problems with muscles and movement. These include:Weakness on one side

  10. Stroke Guide - When To Call a Doctor

    Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if you or someone you know develops signs of stroke.

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