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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - What Increases Your Risk

    The risk factors for a transient ischemic attack (TIA) are the same as those for a stroke.

  2. Stroke Rehabilitation - Concerns of the Caregiver

    Taking care of a loved one who has had a stroke can be difficult for many reasons. You may be afraid that your loved one will have another stroke or will not be able to accept or overcome disabilities. You may worry that you are not prepared to care for someone who has just had a stroke, or you may have your own health concerns that make it difficult for you to care for another person. You may ...

  3. Self-Care After a Stroke - Topic Overview

    After a stroke, keep in mind that you are the most important person in your own recovery. You need to have a major say in the decisions about your care. This may be hard for you, and you may sometimes feel like sitting back and letting others take charge.Make sure others understand that you want to be involved in the decisions about your care.State your wishes and opinions on matters that affect you. Talk with your doctor about your concerns. Ask questions.If you need extra time to think or you have trouble talking, try not to let others make decisions for you without hearing what you have to say.If you have a speech problem, you may have trouble getting others to understand your wishes. Ask someone to help you express your ideas and needs. Or write them down if you can. If you feel that anyone is talking down to you or speaking about you as if you were not present, express your concern. Know and follow your rehabilitation (rehab) plan. Most people find that rehab is hard work and a

  4. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Treatment Overview

    Information on the treatment of transient ischemic attack (TIA).

  5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Symptoms

    Learn the symptoms of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  6. Stroke: Hesitant or Impulsive? - Topic Overview

    Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

  7. Carotid Endarterectomy for TIA and Stroke

    Carotid endarterectomy is surgery to remove plaque buildup in the carotid arteries.

  8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Cause

    Blood clots that temporarily block blood flow to the brain are the most common cause of transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

  9. Stroke: Getting Dressed - Topic Overview

    A stroke often affects movement and use of one side of the body, so getting dressed is often difficult for people after a stroke.Getting dressed may be easier if you use stocking/sock aids, rings or strings attached to zipper pulls, and buttonhooks. Talk with a nurse or physical therapist about assistive devices that may help you get dressed. Clothing may be easier to put on if it has features such as:Velcro closures.Elastic waistbands and shoelaces.Snaps and grippers.To make getting dressed easier:Lay out your clothes in the order that you will put them on, with those you will put on first on top of the pile.Sit down while you dress.Put your affected arm or leg into the piece of clothing first, before the unaffected arm or leg.Removing clothing that has to go over your head may be difficult. To undress after a stroke has affected an arm or leg, remove the stronger arm or leg from the clothing first, then slip out your affected arm or leg.

  10. Stroke Risk and Carotid Endarterectomy - Topic Overview

    Please answer the following questions: Risk of stroke with or without carotid endarterectomy How much carotid stenosis do you have? Have you had symptoms (TIA or mild stroke)? 70% or more Yes No 60–69% Yes No 50–59% Yes No Less than 50% Yes No Don't know Yes No ...

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