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    Stroke Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Stroke

    1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      Some people who have had a stroke have problems seeing in some or all of the normal areas of vision. For example, people with left-sided paralysis may have difficulty seeing to the left. If the problem is due to a vision loss, most people learn to make up for this loss by turning their heads. If the person does not turn his or her head to the affected side, that side of the body may be ignored or neglected.Caregivers may notice signs that the person is ignoring the affected side, such as:Mentioning or responding to stimulation only on the unaffected side of the body.Using only the unaffected arm or leg.Looking only to the environment on the unaffected side.Noticing only someone who speaks or approaches from the unaffected side of the body.Responding to only half of the objects he or she would normally see, such as eating from just one side of the plate.Not recognizing the affected arm and leg as belonging to his or her body and thinking that they belong to someone else.Thinking that

    2. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      If you have a family member who has had a stroke, you may be concerned about how the stroke is going to affect your family's lifestyle. You may be concerned about finances and changes in family roles and responsibilities. Here are some ways to help your loved one and other family members adjust: Realize that after a stroke, your loved one may be prone to strong emotional reactions. Remember that these are a result of the stroke. Try not to become too upset by them.Don't avoid your loved one who's had a stroke. Contact with and support from family members is very important to your loved one's recovery.Join a local support group. These groups provide a place where issues can be discussed in a supportive environment and an opportunity to meet others dealing with the same issues. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.Take care of yourself too. You must stay healthy enough so you can care for your loved one who has had a stroke.You are an important part of your family member's

    3. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      A hemorrhagic stroke develops when a blood vessel (artery) in the brain leaks or bursts (ruptures). This causes bleeding: Inside the brain tissue (intracerebral hemorrhage). Near the surface of the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage or subdural hemorrhage ). A common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage is the rupture of an aneurysm. Hemorrhagic strokes are not as common as strokes caused by a blood ...

    4. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - What Happens

      Find out why a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a warning sign of stroke risk.

    5. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Adapting After a Stroke

      After a stroke, rehabilitation will not only focus on helping you recover from disabilities but also on making changes in your lifestyle, at home, at work, and in relationships. Changes will depend on the type of disabilities, which are determined by the part of your brain that was affected by the stroke.A stroke in the right side of the brain can cause difficulty with performing everyday tasks. .

    6. Stroke Rehabilitation - Medicines for Stroke Rehabilitation

      After a stroke, you may need medicines to decrease pain, treat depression, or help speed your recovery. These may include: Medicines for pain and depression after a stroke. Examples are: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for pain and depression.Tricyclic antidepressants for pain and depression.Anticonvulsant medicines for pain.Medicines for sleeping. After a stroke, you may have ...

    7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Preventing Another Stroke

      There are several factors you cannot change that increase your risk of stroke. But there are also several things that you have some control over which can help you avoid another stroke, including:High blood pressure.Heart disease.High cholesterol.Diabetes.Obesity.Excessive use of alcohol.Use of tobacco products.Too much caffeine.Use of certain illegal drugs, such as cocaine.To prevent another ...

    8. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Topic Overview

      About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

    9. Exercising to Prevent a Stroke - Topic Overview

      Exercise helps lower high blood pressure,which is an important risk factor for stroke. Exercise can help you control other things that put you at risk,such as obesity,high cholesterol and diabetes. It is important to exercise regularly. Do activities that raise your heart rate. Try to do at least 2½ hours a week of moderate exercise. One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day,...

    10. Stroke Recovery: Coping With Eating Problems

      It is common to have trouble swallowing after a stroke (dysphagia). You may not be able to feel food on one or both sides of your mouth. You may have problems chewing or producing enough saliva, or you may have other conditions that make eating difficult and increase your risk of choking.Other things that may interfere with normal eating include:Problems seeing or judging where things are, ...

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