Skip to content

Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Home Treatment

    Home treatment is not appropriate for a transient ischemic attack (TIA). If you think you are having a TIA, do not ignore the symptoms and do not try to manage them at home. Seek emergency medical care when symptoms first appear.

  2. Angiogram of the Head and Neck

    Angiogram of the head and neck is an X-ray test that uses fluoroscopy to take pictures of the blood flow within the blood vessels of the head and neck.

  3. Stroke: Hesitant or Impulsive? - Topic Overview

    Depending on which side of the brain was affected by a stroke, the way a person approaches tasks may be different than it was before the stroke.Stroke on the left side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the left side of the brain tend to be slow, cautious, and disorganized when they are doing unfamiliar activities. They appear anxious and hesitant, which is often quite different from the way they were before the stroke.It may be helpful to offer reassurance or words of encouragement. But don't praise someone for imaginary progress.Offer praise after each step in a task. Allow time for self-correction of mistakes. If the person cannot correct the mistake, point out the error and give a hint.Stroke on the right side of the brainPeople who have had a stroke on the right side of the brain tend to be impulsive and act too quickly. They may act as if they are unaware of their problems. They often try to do things that are beyond their abilities and that may be unsafe, such as

  4. Stroke - Topic Overview

    What is a stroke? A stroke occurs when a blood vessel (artery) that supplies blood to the brain bursts or is blocked by a blood clot. Within minutes, the nerve cells in that area of the brain are damaged, and they may die within a few hours.

  5. Stroke: Changes in Emotions - Topic Overview

    Emotional reactions after a stroke may be different from normal emotional reactions.The reaction may have little or no obvious connection with what is happening around the person.Often reactions can be easily interrupted by diverting the person's attention.People who have had a stroke—usually in the front part of the brain or in the brain stem—can lose emotional control and may switch from crying to laughing for no apparent reason.Crying appears to be the most frequent problem. Crying can be a symptom of depression, which is a medical condition that requires treatment. Untreated depression can interfere with recovery. And it can have a significant impact on enjoyment of life. Medicine may be needed to help control emotional responses and treat depression. People who have had a stroke may act differently because they feel isolated and have vision problems. They may:Become irritable, confused, or restless.Sometimes have false beliefs (delusions).Have hallucinations.This is more

  6. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Depression and Pain After a Stroke

    Drug details for Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression and pain after a stroke.

  7. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - What Increases Your Risk

    The risk factors for a transient ischemic attack (TIA) are the same as those for a stroke.

  8. Stroke and TIA: Who Is Affected - Topic Overview

    About 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. About 610,000 are first strokes, and about 185,000 are recurrent attacks:1Stroke is a leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer.Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States.Women are less likely than men to have a stroke in almost all age ranges. But because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of stroke is higher than for men. And more women than men die from strokes every year.Blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to have a stroke.The exact number of people who have had a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is not known for certain, because people do not always recognize a TIA. And about half of the people who have had a TIA don't ever see a doctor for it. It is estimated that about 200,000 TIAs are diagnosed by a doctor in the United States each year. Men, African Americans, and Mexican Americans have TIAs more often than women and people of other races.1

  9. Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) - Medications

    Learn about medications that are often prescribed for someone who has had a transient ischemic attack (TIA).

  10. After a Stroke: Helping Your Family Adjust - Topic Overview

    If you have a family member who has had a stroke, you may be concerned about how the stroke is going to affect your family's lifestyle. You may be concerned about finances and changes in family roles and responsibilities. Here are some ways to help your loved one and other family members adjust: Realize that after a stroke, your loved one may be prone to strong emotional reactions. Remember that these are a result of the stroke. Try not to become too upset by them.Don't avoid your loved one who's had a stroke. Contact with and support from family members is very important to your loved one's recovery.Join a local support group. These groups provide a place where issues can be discussed in a supportive environment and an opportunity to meet others dealing with the same issues. Ask your doctor about support groups in your area.Take care of yourself too. You must stay healthy enough so you can care for your loved one who has had a stroke.You are an important part of your family member's

Displaying 51 - 60 of 88 Articles << Prev Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next >>

Today on WebMD

brain illustration stroke
Know the 5 signs.
brain scans
Test your stroke smarts.
 
woman with migraine
Is there a link?
brain scan
Get the facts.
 
brain scans
Quiz
woman with migraine
Article
 
brain scan
Article
quit smoking tips
Slideshow
 
Heart Foods Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
Soy For High BP
VIDEO
 
BP Medicine
VIDEO
Lowering Cholesterol Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 

WebMD Special Sections