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Stroke Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Stroke

  1. How Atherosclerosis Causes Half of All Strokes

    About half of all strokes are caused by atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries caused by high blood pressure and ther factors. WebMD tells you what causes atherosclerosis and how to prevent it.

  2. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Depression and Pain After a Stroke

    Drug details for Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression and pain after a stroke.

  3. Stroke: Changes in Emotions - Topic Overview

    Emotional reactions after a stroke may be different from normal emotional reactions.The reaction may have little or no obvious connection with what is happening around the person.Often reactions can be easily interrupted by diverting the person's attention.People who have had a stroke—usually in the front part of the brain or in the brain stem—can lose emotional control and may switch from crying to laughing for no apparent reason.Crying appears to be the most frequent problem. Crying can be a symptom of depression, which is a medical condition that requires treatment. Untreated depression can interfere with recovery. And it can have a significant impact on enjoyment of life. Medicine may be needed to help control emotional responses and treat depression. People who have had a stroke may act differently because they feel isolated and have vision problems. They may:Become irritable, confused, or restless.Sometimes have false beliefs (delusions).Have hallucinations.This is more

  4. Smoking and Stroke Risk - Topic Overview

    Smoking injures blood vessel walls and speeds up hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). As a result, the heart works harder, and blood pressure may increase. Cigarette smoking increases your risk for transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke.Heavy smokers are at greater risk for TIA and stroke. Daily cigarette smoking can increase the risk of stroke by 2½ times.1The risk of stroke and TIA decreases for those who quit smoking. If you smoked less than one pack a day and you quit, within 5 years your risk will be the same as though you had never smoked.1

  5. Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Problems - Topic Overview

    Some people who have a stroke suffer loss of bladder control (urinary incontinence) after the stroke. But this is usually temporary. And it can have many causes, including infection, constipation, and the effects of medicines.If you have problems controlling your bladder, your doctor may: Test a urine sample to see if you have an infection. Do tests to see how you urinate, which can help you and your doctor decide what treatment might work best for you.Help you develop a schedule of regular bathroom use that fits your abilities.Suggest that you wear protective clothing or a pad.Prescribe medicines, depending on the cause of your bladder problems.Some things you can do to prevent bladder leakage include:Emptying your bladder at regular intervals, including when you first wake up and at bedtime.Controlling your liquid intake, such as drinking liquids at regular intervals and limiting fluid intake after dinner.Urinary retentionYou may have trouble emptying your bladder completely

  6. Stroke: Dealing With Depression - Topic Overview

    It is common for a person who has had a stroke to feel sad and become depressed about the disabilities caused by the stroke. Sometimes the injury to the brain from the stroke can cause depression. Depression is a serious condition that needs treatment.People who are depressed may: Feel negative, hopeless, or down in the dumps.Have a noticeable loss of interest or pleasure in almost all activities. People who are depressed may also:Lose or gain weight.Have decreased or increased appetite.Have difficulty falling asleep or sleep too much. They usually feel tired all the time.Feel worthless or guilty.Be more irritable or angry.Be unable to concentrate, remember, or make decisions as well as they did before the stroke.Have recurring thoughts of death or suicide. If you or your loved one has warning signs of suicide, seek medical help right away.People with depression may be reluctant to seek help, because they feel that it is a sign of personal weakness or a character flaw or that they

  7. Stroke Recovery: Coping With Eating Problems

    It is common to have trouble swallowing after a stroke (dysphagia). You may not be able to feel food on one or both sides of your mouth. You may have problems chewing or producing enough saliva, or you may have other conditions that make eating difficult and increase your risk of choking.Other things that may interfere with normal eating include:Problems seeing or judging where things are, ...

  8. Stroke Organizations

    If you or someone you love has just had a stroke, here are links to stroke organizations and resources.

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