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3. Caffeine and Urinary Incontinence

As you are figuring out your personalized urinary incontinence diet, know that caffeine is a kind of "double whammy" for those with incontinence. "Caffeine stimulates the bladder on one hand, and it also acts as a diuretic," says Rodney Appell, MD, a urologist and director of the Baylor Continence Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.

It's best, he says, to eliminate coffee and other caffeine sources completely from your diet when you have urinary incontinence.

Caffeine is in soft drinks, many teas, chocolate, and even -- in small amounts -- in decaf coffee.

But eliminating coffee (not to mention chocolate) can be difficult, Anger acknowledges. She tells her patients with urinary incontinence: "If you are a big coffee drinker, cut down to one or two cups a day."

Also, drink most of your coffee in the morning so you don't have to get up often at night to urinate. Avoid drinking coffee after 7 p.m. or so, Anger advises.

4. Spicy Foods and Urinary Incontinence

If you've got urge incontinence (overactive bladder), you may want to avoid in your diet spicy-hot foods such as Mexican or hot Chinese fare, chili peppers, chili, horseradish, and other highly spiced foods.

"In the same way caffeine can be an irritant, spicy foods are shown to be an irritant in the lining of the bladder," says Christine Gerbstadt, MD, RD, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association and a nutrition consultant in Sarasota, Fla., and Philadelphia.

Again, figuring out what spicy foods make your symptoms worse requires trial and error, she says, until you come up with your tailor-made urinary incontinence diet.

5. Acidic Foods and Urinary Incontinence

If you have urinary incontinence, it's wise to avoid citrus foods, including orange juice, cranberry juice, and other citrus beverages, says Rosenman. Citrus foods and drinks are highly acidic and tend to irritate the bladder. Cranberry juice has a reputation for helping to clear up bladder infections, but it does not help with overactive bladder and urge incontinence, Rosenman says.

6. Carbonated Drinks and Urinary Incontinence

Even if carbonated drinks are not caffeinated, they may not have a place in your personalized urinary incontinence diet, Rosenman says.

"The carbon dioxide in the drink can irritate a sensitive bladder," she says. And once the irritation sets in, you can have the urge of having to go, the typical symptom of urge incontinence.

How to Talk About Urinary Incontinence

Bringing up urinary incontinence during a routine doctor's office visit can be embarrassing and difficult. But it's important to start the conversation.

Rosenman suggests the straightforward approach. Try saying something like: ''I'm having some problems with my bladder."

At that point, the doctor should begin asking you very specific questions, Rosenman says. He or she should ask, for instance, if you need to get up during the night to urinate, and if you leak and how often.

"If the doctor does not follow up with questions, ask for a referral," she says.

Embarrassed by Incontinence?

A visual guide of
incontinence tips to reduce embarrassment.
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