Skip to content

    Incontinence & Overactive Bladder Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    OAB Questions For and From Your Doctor

    By
    WebMD Feature

    If your daily schedule is dictated by frequent and sudden urinary urges that leave you scrambling for the nearest bathroom, and you haven't already been to see your doctor -- it's time to make an appointment to get your overactive bladder treated.

    Whether you see a primary care doctor, internal medicine practitioner, urologist, or gynecologist doesn't matter. What does matter is that you get help for symptoms such as urinary urgency, frequent urination, waking up often during the night to urinate, and urge incontinence (abnormal bladder contractions that cause uncontrolled leakage of urine).

    Recommended Related to Urinary Incontinence/OAB

    The Scariest Article You'll Ever Read About Your Ladyparts

    By Jen MatlackWe open up about four hush-hush conditions -- from peeing your pants to ridiculously heavy periods -- that millions of women are suffering from in silence. Maybe even you.

    Read the The Scariest Article You'll Ever Read About Your Ladyparts article > >

    Treatment is important because an overactive bladder can seriously interfere with activities, says Donna Y. Deng, MD, MS, a urologist and associate professor at the University of California-San Francisco who also serves on the board of directors at the National Association for Continence.

    People may need to pull off the freeway immediately to find a restroom, or map out every public bathroom before they run errands. Some people are afraid to leave their homes and become isolated. “People really redefine themselves,” Deng says. “They really plan their lives around the bathroom. It’s definitely a great detriment to quality of life.”

    In some cases, the urge is so strong that it overrides the urethral muscles that help control leakage from the bladder, and people can’t reach a toilet in time. “There’s very little warning time,” Deng says.

    Talking About Overactive Bladder

    Talking about such personal issues can be uncomfortable, but worthwhile, experts say. “Patients often don’t volunteer information,” says Tomas L. Griebling, MD, MPH, professor and vice chair of the department of urology at the University of Kansas and a faculty associate in the Landon Center on Aging.

    Tell your doctor about overactive bladder problems, he says. “There are usually things that we can do to try to help people.”

    Voiding Diary   

    When you start treatment for OAB, your doctor might ask you to keep a voiding diary. The diary can help your doctor see what symptoms you're having, and evaluate how well your treatment is working. In your diary, record when you urinate each time, how much urine you pass, whether you leak and how much leakage you have, what you were doing when the leakage occurred, and what/how much you drink and eat each day.

    1 | 2 | 3

    Today on WebMD

    womens restroom sign
    Symptoms, causes, and treatments.
    hand over mouth
    Test your urine knowledge.
     
    man breathing with mouth open
    Is it true that men can do kegels?
    bathroom sign running
    Assess your symptoms.
     
    woman holding water
    Slideshow
    Food That Makes You Gotta Go
    Slideshow
     
    Male Incontinence Slideshow
    Slideshow
    Mature woman standing among peers
    Article
     
    Worried in bed
    Article
    woman standing in front of restroom sign
    Slideshow
     
    various pills
    Video
    sitting in chair
    Article