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4 Drugs Linked to Urinary Incontinence

If you have urinary incontinence or if your incontinence problem seems to be getting worse, take stock of your medicine cabinet. Commonly used drugs could be the cause of your incontinence, or at least be a contributing factor.

If you suspect medications may be worsening urinary leakage or even causing it, let your doctor know about all the medicines you take, both prescription and over-the-counter. That way, your doctor can help determine whether these medicines should be adjusted or stopped, or if a treatment should be modified.

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Here are the most common drugs that can worsen or cause urinary incontinence:

1. High Blood Pressure Drugs and Incontinence

Also called alpha-adrenergic antagonists or alpha blockers, these high blood pressure drugs -- including Cardura, Minipress, and Hytrin -- work by dilating blood vessels to reduce blood pressure. In fact, they are often prescribed to men to help with urination problems. In men with an enlarged prostate, a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH, alpha blockers can help relax the muscles in the bladder neck, letting urine flow more easily and improving symptoms of BPH.

In women, alpha blockers can relax the bladder too. Women taking an alpha blocker who are experiencing urinary incontinence should also ask their doctor if there is an alternative medication available to treat their high blood pressure.

 

2. Antidepressants and Incontinence

While a few antidepressants actually help urinary incontinence (Tofranil and Elavil), most can worsen symptoms, at least in some people, Appell tells WebMD.

Antidepressants can impair the ability of the bladder to contract, worsening symptoms of overflow incontinence, because the bladder can't empty completely. Other antidepressants may decrease your awareness of the need to go to the bathroom.

If you think your antidepressant is worsening your incontinence, talk to your doctor about switching to another medication.

3. Diuretics and Incontinence

Commonly called "water pills," diuretics work in the kidney to reduce blood pressure by flushing excess water and salt out of the body.

"If you take your diuretic, you are making more urine," says David Ginsberg, MD, a urologist and associate professor of clinical urology at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

That translates to more bathroom visits and a worsening of incontinence symptoms, he says.

"If you need the diuretic, you need it," says Ginsberg. But he recommends you pay more attention to the recommended incontinence treatments, following your doctor's instructions to the letter.

That may mean paying more attention to doing Kegel exercises, designed to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. Weakened pelvic floor muscles are often the cause of a common type of urinary incontinence called stress incontinence, in which small amounts of urine are leaked, especially when you cough, sneeze, or laugh.

Once you learn how to do Kegel exercises correctly (ask your gynecologist or internist for help), you can do them nearly anytime -- even while driving a car or watching TV or sitting at your desk.

If nighttime incontinence is a problem, you might ask your doctor if you could take the diuretic in the morning, suggests Jennifer Anger, MD, MPH, a urologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Group in Los Angeles.

That way, the volume of urine would be greater in the morning and hopefully taper off as the day goes on.

WebMD Medical Reference

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