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Powerhouse Peanuts

Like other legumes, peanuts are packed with the protein your body needs to build and repair muscle. They also contain mono- and polyunsaturated fats, important for heart health. The nutrients in peanuts possibly may lower your risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.  

Eat peanuts with their thin red skins on, suggests David Grotto, RD, author of 101 Foods That Could Save Your Life!, and you'll get the same antioxidants you find in wine and chocolate.

Kefir

Kefir is a fermented drink usually made with cow, goat, or sheep's milk, though it can also be made from rice, coconut, or soy milk.

Described by some as a mildly carbonated liquid yogurt, kefir is rich in calcium and protein and is also "a good source of magnesium, riboflavin, folate, and B12," says Grotto. Like yogurt, kefir contains probiotics, which not only aid digestion but may also help manage symptoms of IBS or Crohn's disease. These probiotics may also treat or prevent vaginal or urinary infections in women.

Kefir can be a nutritious, drinkable breakfast or quick, filling snack, but you can also blend it in smoothies and shakes or add it to soups, breads, and other baked goods.

Vitamin-C Rich Strawberries

Strawberries may be the favorite fruit of summer. More than just juicy and sweet, strawberries also pack 160% of your daily vitamin C inside that succulent scarlet skin.  

Strawberries are a great source for digestion-boosting fiber, for vitamin C, which helps keep teeth and gums in good condition, and for flavonoids, which may improve mental function and fight breast and prostate cancer.  

Fresh or frozen, strawberries "are a nutrition powerhouse," Grotto says, so add them to a summer salad, make a succulent fruit salsa, or drizzle ripe, ruby-red strawberries with a bit of dark chocolate for a healthier alternative to cake.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms don't just add flavor to a stir-fry; they're also low in calories and an excellent source of the cancer-fighting mineral, selenium.  

Additionally, these humble plants are the highest vegetarian source of vitamin D and they're high in copper and potassium, nutrients needed for normal heart rhythm, nerve function, and red blood cell production.  

Mushrooms cook in a flash and pair equally well with vegetarian, vegan, or meaty meals. Slice them onto sandwiches or into salads, or put them in any recipe that could use a more toothsome texture.

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