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Potassium is a mineral that's crucial for life. Potassium is necessary for the heart, kidneys, and other organs to work normally.

Why do people take potassium?

Most people who eat a healthy diet should get enough potassium naturally. However, many Americans don't eat a healthy diet and may be deficient in potassium. Low potassium is associated with a risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders, and infertility. For people with low potassium, doctors sometimes recommend improved diets -- or potassium supplements -- to prevent or treat some of these conditions.

Potassium deficiencies are more common in people who:

  • Use certain medicines, such as diuretics and certain birth control pills
  • Have physically demanding jobs
  • Are athletes
  • Have health conditions that affect their digestive absorption, such as Crohn's disease
  • Have an eating disorder
  • Smoke
  • Abuse alcohol or drugs

How much potassium should you take?

The Institute of Medicine has set an adequate intake for potassium. Getting this amount of potassium from diet, with or without supplements, should be enough to keep you healthy. The FDA has determined that foods that contain at least 350 milligrams of potassium can bear the following label: "Diets containing foods that are good sources of potassium and low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke."


Adequate Intake (AI)


0-6 months

400 mg/day

7-12 months

700 mg/day

1-3 years

3,000 mg/day

4-8 years

3,800 mg/day

9-13 years

4,500 mg/day

14 years and up

4,700 mg/day


18 years and up

4,700 mg/day

Pregnant women

4,700 mg/day

Breastfeeding women

5,100 mg/day

Always take potassium supplements with a full glass of water or juice.

There is no set upper limit for potassium. So it's not clear exactly how much potassium you can take safely. However, very high doses of potassium can be deadly.

Can you get potassium naturally from foods?

Good natural food sources of potassium include:

  • Bananas
  • Avocados
  • Nuts, like almonds and peanuts
  • Citrus fruits
  • Leafy, green vegetables
  • Milk
  • Potatoes

Keep in mind that some types of cooking, such as boiling, can destroy the potassium in some foods.

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