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BEER

Other Names:

Alcohol, Alcool, Bière, Cerveza, Ethanol, Éthanol.

HIBISCUS Overview
HIBISCUS Uses
HIBISCUS Side Effects
HIBISCUS Interactions
HIBISCUS Dosing
HIBISCUS Overview Information

Beer is an alcoholic drink.

Beer is used for preventing diseases of the heart and circulatory system, including coronary heart disease, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), heart failure, heart attack, and stroke. It is also used to reduce the chance of death from heart attack and from another heart condition called ischemic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction.

Beer is also used for preventing decline of thinking skills in later life, Alzheimer's disease, weak bones (osteoporosis), gallstones, type 2 diabetes, heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes, kidney stones, prostate cancer, breast cancer, other cancers, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. H. pylori is the bacterium that causes ulcers.

Some people use beer to stimulate the appetite and digestion, and to increase the flow of breast milk.

How does it work?

Beer is thought to help prevent heart disease by increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL), also known as "good cholesterol." Also, the vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) contained in beer can help lower homocysteine levels, a chemical considered to be one of the risk factors for heart disease.

HIBISCUS Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Likely Effective for:

  • Preventing diseases of the heart and circulatory system, such as heart attack, stroke, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), and chest pain (angina). There is some evidence that drinking alcohol can benefit the heart. Drinking one alcoholic beverage per day or drinking alcohol on at least 3 to 4 days per week is a good rule of thumb for people who drink alcohol. But don’t drink more than 2 drinks per day. More than two drinks daily can increase the risk of over-all death as well as dying from heart disease. Here is what researchers have found:
    • Drinking alcoholic beverages, including beer, by healthy people seems to reduce the risk of developing heart disease. Moderate alcohol use (one to two drinks per day) reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis, and heart attack by approximately 30% to 50% when compared with nondrinkers.
    • Light to moderate alcohol (one to two drinks per day) use reduces the risk of having the type of stroke that is caused by a clot in the blood vessel (ischemic stroke), but increases the risk of having the type of stroke caused by a broken blood vessel (hemorrhagic stroke).
    • Light to moderate alcohol consumption (one to two drinks per day) in the year before a first heart attack is associated with a reduced cardiovascular and all-cause mortality risk compared with non-drinkers.
    • In men with established coronary heart disease, consumption of 1-14 alcoholic drinks per week, including beer, doesn't seem to have any effect on heart disease or all-cause mortality compared with men who drink less than one drink per week. Drinking three or more drinks per day is associated with increased likelihood of death in men with a history of heart attacks.
  • Reducing the risk of dying from heart disease and stroke and other causes. There is some evidence that light to moderate consumption of alcoholic drinks can reduce the risk of all-cause death in people who are middle-aged and older.

Possibly Effective for:

  • Preventing congestive heart failure (CHF). There is some evidence that consuming one to four alcoholic drinks per day reduces the risk of heart failure in people aged 65 years or older.
  • Preventing diabetes (type 2) and heart disease in people with diabetes. People who drink alcohol in moderate amounts seem to have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes who consume alcohol in moderate amounts seem to have a reduced risk of coronary heart disease compared with non-drinkers with type 2 diabetes. The risk reduction is similar to that found in healthy people who consume light to moderate amounts of alcohol.
  • Maintaining thinking skills with aging. Elderly men who have a history of drinking one alcoholic drink per day seem to maintain better general thinking ability during their late 70s and 80s compared to non-drinkers. However, drinking more than four alcoholic drinks per day during middle age seems to be linked with significantly poorer thinking ability later in life.
  • Preventing ulcers caused by a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori. There is some evidence that moderate to high consumption of alcohol (more than 75 grams) per week from beverages such as beer and wine can reduce the risk of H. pylori infection.

Possibly Ineffective for:

  • Reducing the risk of death from cancer. Although drinking wine has been linked with some reductions in cancer mortality, drinking beer does not seem to have this effect. In fact, there is some evidence that drinking beer might slightly increase cancer-related death. There is some evidence that drinking one or more alcoholic drinks might increase the likelihood of death from breast cancer.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Preventing Alzheimer's disease. Developing evidence suggests one to two alcoholic drinks per day can reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease in both men and women compared to non-drinkers.
  • Anxiety. The effect of alcohol on anxiety is complicated and may be affected by the psychological state of the user. Alcohol sometimes reduces anxiety, sometimes increases it, and sometimes has no effect.
  • Weak bones (osteoporosis). There is some developing evidence that suggests moderate alcohol consumption in women who have passed menopause is linked with stronger bones. Alcohol intake of one-half to one drink per day seems to have the greatest effect on bone strength compared with non-drinkers and heavy drinkers of alcohol.
  • Preventing prostate cancer.
  • Preventing breast cancer.
  • Preventing gallstones.
  • Preventing kidney stones.
  • Stimulating appetite and digestion.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of beer for these uses.


HIBISCUS Side Effects & Safety

Beer seems to be safe for most people when used in moderation. This translates to two or fewer 12 ounce glasses a day. Drinking more than this at one sitting can cause a lot of side effects, including: flushing, confusion, trouble controlling emotions, blackouts, loss of coordination, seizures, drowsiness, trouble breathing, hypothermia, low blood sugar, vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding, irregular heartbeat, and others.

Long-term use can lead to alcohol dependence and can cause many serious side effects, including: malnutrition, memory loss, mental problems, heart problems, liver failure, swelling (inflammation) of the pancreas, cancers of the digestive track, and others.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Alcohol is UNSAFE to drink during pregnancy. It can cause birth defects and other serious harm to the unborn infant. Drinking alcohol during pregnancy, especially during the first two months, is associated with significant risk of miscarriage, fetal alcohol syndrome, as well as developmental and behavioral disorders after birth. Don’t drink alcohol if you are pregnant.

Don’t drink alcohol if you are breast-feeding. Alcohol passes into breast milk and can cause abnormal development of skills that involve both mental and muscular coordination, such as the ability to turn over. Alcohol can also disturb the infant’s sleep pattern. Despite a rumor to the contrary, alcohol also seems to reduce milk production.

Asthma: There have been occasional reports of asthma triggered by drinking beer.

Gout: Using alcohol can make gout worse.

Heart conditions: While there is some evidence that drinking beer in moderation might help to prevent congestive heart failure, beer is harmful when used by someone who already has this condition. Using alcohol can make chest pain and congestive heart failure worse.

High blood pressure: Drinking three or more alcoholic drinks per day can increase blood pressure and make high blood pressure worse.

High levels of blood fats called triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia): Drinking alcohol can make this condition worse.

Trouble sleeping (insomnia): Drinking alcohol can make insomnia worse.

Liver disease: Drinking alcohol can make liver disease worse.

Neurological conditions: Drinking alcohol can make certain disorders of the nervous system worse.

A condition of the pancreas called pancreatitis: Drinking alcohol can make pancreatitis worse.

Stomach ulcers or a type of heartburn called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): Drinking alcohol can make these conditions worse.

A blood condition called porphyria: Alcohol use can make porphyria worse.

Mental problems: Drinking three or more drinks of alcohol per day can make mental problems worse and reduce thinking skills.

Surgery: Beer can slow down the central nervous system. There is a concern that combining beer with anesthesia and other medications used during and after surgery might slow the central nervous system down too much. Stop drinking beer at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

HIBISCUS Interactions What is this?

Major Interaction Do not take this combination

  • Disulfiram (Antabuse) interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down the alcohol in beer to get rid of it. Disulfiram (Antabuse) decreases how fast the body breaks down alcohol. Drinking beer and taking disulfiram (Antabuse) can cause a pounding headache, vomiting, flushing, and other unpleasant reactions. Don't drink any alcohol if you are taking disulfiram (Antabuse).

  • Erythromycin interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down the alcohol in beer to get rid of it. Erythromycin can decrease how quickly the body gets rid of alcohol. Drinking beer and taking erythromycin might increase the effects and side effects of alcohol.

  • Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer can harm the liver. Drinking beer and taking medications that can harm the liver can increase the risk of liver damage. Do not drink beer if you are taking a medication that can harm the liver.

    Some medications that can harm the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), isoniazid (INH), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), methyldopa (Aldomet), fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), erythromycin (Erythrocin, Ilosone, others), phenytoin (Dilantin) , lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and many others.

  • Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedative medications. Drinking beer and taking sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness and other serious side effects.

    Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with BEER

    Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. The alcohol in beer can interact with warfarin (Coumadin). Drinking large amounts of alcohol can change the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.


Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Antibiotics (Sulfonamide antibiotics) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer can interact with some antibiotics. This can lead to upset stomach, vomiting, sweating, headache, and an increased heartbeat. Do not drink beer when taking antibiotics.

    Some antibiotics that interact with beer include sulfamethoxazole (Gantanol), sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), sulfisoxazole (Gantrisin), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra), and others.

  • Aspirin interacts with BEER

    Aspirin can sometimes damage the stomach and cause ulcers and bleeding. The alcohol in beer can also damage the stomach. Taking aspirin along with beer might increase the chance of ulcers and bleeding in the stomach. Avoid taking beer and aspirin together.

  • Cefamandole (Mandol) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer can interact with cefamandole (Mandol). This can lead to upset stomach, vomiting, sweating, headache, and an increased heartbeat. Do not drink beer while taking cefamandole (Mandol).

  • Cefoperazone (Cefobid) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer can interact with cefoperazone (Cefobid). This can lead to upset stomach, vomiting, sweating, headache, and an increased heartbeat. Do not drink beer while taking cefoperazone (Cefobid).

  • Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down the alcohol in beer to get rid of it. Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) might decrease how quickly the body breaks down alcohol. Drinking beer and taking chlorpropamide (Diabinese) might cause a headache, vomiting, flushing, and other unpleasant reactions. Don't drink beer if you are taking chlorpropamide (Diabinese).

  • Cisapride (Propulsid) interacts with BEER

    Cisapride (Propulsid) might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of the alcohol in beer. Taking cisapride (Propulsid) along with beer might increase the effects and side effects of the alcohol in beer.

  • Griseofulvin (Fulvicin) interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down the alcohol in beer to get rid of it. Griseofulvin (Fulvicin) decreases how quickly the body breaks down alcohol. Drinking beer and taking griseofulvin (Fulvicin) can cause a pounding headache, vomiting, flushing, and other unpleasant reactions. Don't drink any alcohol if you are taking griseofulvin (Fulvicin).

  • Medications for pain (Narcotic drugs) interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down some medications for pain to get rid of them. The alcohol in beer might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of some medications for pain. Drinking beer and taking some medications for pain might increase the effects and side effects of some medications for pain.

    Some medications for pain that might interact with alcohol include meperidine (Demerol), hydrocodone, morphine, OxyContin, and many others.

  • Medications that decrease stomach acid (H2-Blockers) interacts with BEER

    Some medications that decrease stomach acid might interact with the alcohol in beer. Drinking beer and taking some medications that decrease stomach acid might increase how much alcohol the body absorbs, and increase the risk of side effects of alcohol.

    Some medications that decrease stomach acid and might interact with alcohol include cimetidine (Tagamet), ranitidine (Zantac), nizatidine (Axid), and famotidine (Pepcid).

  • Metformin (Glucophage) interacts with BEER

    Metformin (Glucophage) is broken down by the body in the liver. The alcohol in beer is also broken down in the body by the liver. Drinking beer and taking metformin might cause serious side effects.

  • Metronidazole (Flagyl) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer can interact with metronidazole (Flagyl). This can lead to upset stomach, vomiting, sweating, headache, and an increased heartbeat. Do not drink beer while taking metronidazole (Flagyl).

  • NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) interacts with BEER

    NSAIDs are anti-inflammatory medications used for decreasing pain and swelling. NSAIDs can sometimes damage the stomach and intestines and cause ulcers and bleeding. The alcohol in beer can also damage the stomach and intestines. Taking NSAIDs along with beer might increase the chance of ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines. Avoid taking beer and NSAIDs together.

    Some NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin, others), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), aspirin, and others.

  • Phenytoin (Dilantin) interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin) to get rid of it. The alcohol in beer might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin). Drinking beer and taking phenytoin (Dilantin) might decrease the effectiveness of phenytoin (Dilantin) and increase the possibility of seizures.

  • Sedative medications (Barbiturates) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedative medications. Taking beer along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness. Do not drink beer if you are taking sedative medications.

  • Sedative medications (Benzodiazepines) interacts with BEER

    The alcohol in beer might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Drugs that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedative medications. Taking beer along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness. Do not drink beer if you are taking sedative medications.

    Some of these sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), and others.

  • Tolbutamide (Orinase) interacts with BEER

    The body breaks down the alcohol in beer to get rid of it. Tolbutamide (Orinase) can decrease how quickly the body breaks down alcohol. Drinking beer and taking tolbutamide (Orinase) can cause a pounding headache, vomiting, flushing, and other unpleasant reactions. Don't drink beer if you are taking tolbutamide (Orinase).


HIBISCUS Dosing

Alcohol intake is often measured in number of "drinks." One drink is equivalent to a 4 oz or a 120 mL glass of wine, 12 oz of beer, or 1 oz of spirits.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For lowering the chance of developing heart disease or stroke: one or two 12 oz drinks of beer per day.
  • For lowering the chance of developing heart failure: Up to four glasses per day.
  • For a smaller reduction in thinking skills in older men: Up to one drink per day.
  • For reduced risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy men: Three drinks per day to two drinks per week.
  • For reducing the risk of coronary heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes: Up to seven drinks per week.
  • For lowering a chance of developing Helicobacter pylori infection: Consuming 75 grams of alcohol from beverages such as beer. Helicobacter pylori are bacteria that cause stomach ulcers.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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