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SILICON

Other Names:

Acide Orthosilicique, Atomic number 14, Dioxyde de Silicium, Numéro Atomique 14, Orthosilicic Acid, Phytolithic Silica, Polysilicone-11, Si, Silica, Silica Hydride, Silice Hydride, Silicea, Silicio, Silicium, Silicium de Sodium, Silicon Dioxide,...
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SILICON Overview
SILICON Uses
SILICON Side Effects
SILICON Interactions
SILICON Dosing
SILICON Overview Information

Silicon is a mineral. Silicon supplements are used as medicine.

Silicon is used for weak bones (osteoporosis), heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease), Alzheimer's disease, hair loss, and improving hair and nail quality. It is also used for improving skin healing; and for treating sprains and strains, as well as digestive system disorders.

Do not confuse silicon with silicone. Silicone is the name of a group of materials resembling plastic that contain silicon, oxygen, and other chemicals. Silicone is used to make breast implants, medical tubing, and a variety of other medical devices.

How does it work?

A clear biological function for silicon in humans has not been established. There is some evidence, though, that silicon might have a role in bone and collagen formation.

SILICON Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Increasing bone strength when obtained from foods. Men and younger (pre-menopausal) women who get more silicon from their diet seem to have higher bone mineral density, which could reduce the risk of weak bones (osteoporosis). But higher silicon intake does not seem to benefit older (post-menopausal) women. These women tend to develop weak bones because their bodies continually break down bone. Silicon doesn’t seem to stop the bone breakdown. It promotes only bone formation.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Heart disease.
  • Alzheimer's disease.
  • Sprains and strain.
  • Digestion problems.
  • Hair loss.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of silicon for these uses.


SILICON Side Effects & Safety

Silicon is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts. Its safety as a medicine is unknown.

Kidney stones can occur, though rarely, in people taking silicon-containing antacids for long periods of time.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Silicon is LIKELY SAFE when used in food amounts. Its safety in larger medicinal amounts is unknown. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

SILICON Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for SILICON Interactions

SILICON Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For osteoporosis: dietary intakes of 40 mg of silicon seem to be linked with stronger bones than lower doses.
There is no recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for silicon, since an essential biological role for it has not been identified.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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