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BACH FLOWER REMEDIES

Other Names:

Bach, Bach Flower, Bach Flower Essence, Bach Flower Remedies, Bach Flower Remedy, Bach Remedies, Batch Flower Remedies, BFR, BFRs, Edward Bach Remedies, Élixirs Floraux du Docteur Bach, Essences Florales de Bach, Fleurs de Bach, Florathérapie, F...
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BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Overview
BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Uses
BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Side Effects
BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Interactions
BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Dosing
BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Overview Information

Bach (pronounced “Batch”) flower remedies are prepared by soaking plant material in water that is then exposed to sunlight. Alternatively, the plant material is boiled. A small amount of the liquid is then mixed with distilled water and preserved in brandy. There are 38 different remedies that vary depending on the plant combinations used.

Bach flower remedies were developed in the 1930s by Dr. Edward Bach while he worked at the London Homeopathic Hospital. Many people often refer to Bach flower remedies as homeopathic products because they are diluted like homeopathic remedies. However, there are differences in the principles of Bach flower remedies compared to homeopathy. For example, repeated dilutions are at the heart of homeopathy, but are not a part of Bach flower remedies. Furthermore, “the law of similars” in homeopathy does not apply to Bach flower remedies. The law of similars says that if a substance in large amounts causes a certain disease, then that same substance in small amounts could cure the disease.

Dr. Bach believed that illnesses are the result of “flaws” in personality. He believed that a person’s own nature, character, and feelings play a key role in the development of diseases. So it’s not surprising that Bach flower remedies are often promoted to help mental and emotional problems, rather than to directly treat physical ailments.

Bach flower remedies are used for emotional conditions, depression, anxiety, spiritual conditions, fatigue, asthma, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), headaches, migraine headaches, muscle pain, and stress.

How does it work?

Bach flower remedies are usually so diluted that they contain little or no detectable amounts of active ingredients. Therefore, just as with homeopathic preparations, Bach flower remedies are not expected to have any beneficial drug-like effects, or any interactions or side effects.

BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Insufficient Evidence for:

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Bach flower remedies for these uses.


BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Side Effects & Safety

There are no known safety concerns. Since most Bach flower remedies contain little or no active ingredient, these products are not expected to have any beneficial or adverse effects.

However, these products are preserved in brandy and therefore contain alcohol.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s UNSAFE to use Bach flower remedies if you are pregnant because they contain alcohol. Alcohol can cause birth defects and other harm to infants before they are born.

It’s also UNSAFE to use Bach flower remedies if you are breast-feeding. The alcohol in these preparations passes into breast milk and can interfere with the nursing infant’s development.

BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Interactions

BACH FLOWER REMEDIES Dosing

The appropriate dose depends on the specific Bach flower remedy being used.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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