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PROPOLIS

Other Names:

Acide de Cire d’Abeille, Baume de Propolis, Bee Glue, Bee Propolis, Beeswax Acid, Cire d’Abeille Synthétique, Cire de Propolis, Colle d’Abeille, Hive Dross, Pénicilline Russe, Propóleos, Propolis Balsam, Propolis Cera, Propolis d'Abeille, Propol...
See All Names

Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Overview
Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Uses
Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Side Effects
Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Interactions
Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Dosing
Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Overview Information

Propolis is a resin-like material from the buds of poplar and cone-bearing trees. Propolis is rarely available in its pure form. It is usually obtained from beehives and contains bee products.

Propolis has a long history of medicinal use, dating back to 350 B.C., the time of Aristotle. Greeks have used propolis for abscesses; Assyrians have used it for healing wounds and tumors; and Egyptians have used it for mummification. It still has many medicinal uses today, although its effectiveness has only been shown for a couple of them.

Propolis is used for canker sores and infections caused by bacteria (including tuberculosis), by viruses (including flu, H1N1 “swine” flu, and the common cold), by fungus, and by single-celled organisms called protozoans. Propolis is also used for cancer of the nose and throat; for boosting the immune system; and for treating gastrointestinal (GI) problems including Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease. Propolis is also used as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent.

People sometimes apply propolis directly to the skin for wound cleansing, genital herpes and cold sores; as a mouth rinse for speeding healing following oral surgery; and for the treatment of minor burns.

In manufacturing, propolis is used as an ingredient in cosmetics.

How does it work?

Propolis seems to have activity against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. It might also have anti-inflammatory effects and help skin heal.

Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Cold sores. Applying a specific 3% propolis ointment (Herstat or ColdSore-FX) might help improve healing time and reduce pain from cold sores.
  • Genital herpes. Applying a 3% propolis ointment (Herstat or ColdSore-FX) might improve healing of recurrent genital lesions caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Some research suggests that it might heal lesions faster and more completely than the conventional treatment 5% acyclovir ointment.
  • Improving healing and reducing pain and inflammation after mouth surgery.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Cancer sores.
  • Tuberculosis.
  • Infections.
  • Nose and throat cancer.
  • Improving immune response.
  • Ulcers.
  • Stomach and intestinal disorders.
  • Common cold.
  • Wounds.
  • Inflammation.
  • Minor burns.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate propolis for these uses.


Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Side Effects & Safety

There isn't enough information to know if propolis is safe. It can cause allergic reactions, particularly in people who are allergic to bees or bee products. Lozenges containing propolis can cause irritation and mouth ulcers.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of propolis during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Asthma: Some experts believe some chemicals in propolis may make asthma worse. Avoid using propolis if you have asthma.

Allergies: Don’t use propolis if you are allergic to bee by-products including honey, conifers, poplars, Peru balsam, and salicylates.

Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Interactions

Hive Dross (PROPOLIS) Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

APPLIED TO THE SKIN:

  • For cold sores: A 3% propolis ointment (Herstat or ColdSore-FX) applied 5 times daily.
  • For herpes outbreak: A 3% propolis ointment (Herstat or ColdSore-FX) applied to the blisters 4 times daily.
  • As a mouth rinse after mouth surgery: A solution containing propolis, water, and alcohol.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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