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GLYCEROL

Other Names:

1,2,3-propanetriol, Alcool Glycériné, Glicerol, Glucerite, Glycerin, Glycerine, Glycérine, Glycérine Végétale, Glycerol Monostearate, Glycérol, Glycerolum, Glyceryl Alcohol, Monostéarate de Glycérol, Vegetable Glycerin.

GLYCEROL Overview
GLYCEROL Uses
GLYCEROL Side Effects
GLYCEROL Interactions
GLYCEROL Dosing
GLYCEROL Overview Information

Glycerol is a naturally occurring chemical. People use it as a medicine. Some uses and dosage forms have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Glycerol is taken by mouth for weight loss, improving exercise performance, helping the body replace water lost during diarrhea and vomiting, and reducing pressure inside the eye in people with glaucoma. Athletes also use glycerol to keep from becoming dehydrated.

Healthcare providers sometimes give glycerol intravenously (by IV) to reduce pressure inside the brain in various conditions including stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, Reye's syndrome, pseudotumor cerebri, central nervous system (CNS) trauma, and CNS tumors; for reducing brain volume for neurosurgical procedures; and for treating fainting on standing due to poor blood flow to the brain (postural syncope).

Some people apply glycerol to the skin as a moisturizer.

Eye doctors sometimes put a solution that contains glycerol in the eye to reduce fluid in the cornea before an eye exam.

Rectally, glycerol is used as a laxative.

How does it work?

Glycerol attracts water into the gut, softening stools and relieving constipation.

GLYCEROL Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Likely Effective for:


Possibly Ineffective for:


Likely Ineffective for:

  • Improving exercise performance when taken by mouth.
  • Treating acute stroke when used intravenously.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Helping maintain the body's water levels (hydration) in athletes and people with intestinal problems.
  • Wrinkled skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate glycerol for these uses.


GLYCEROL Side Effects & Safety

Glycerol seems to be safe for most adults. When taken by mouth, glycerol can cause side effects including headaches, dizziness, bloating, nausea, vomiting, thirst, and diarrhea.

Glycerol may not be safe when injected intravenously (by IV). Red blood cells might get seriously damaged.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of glycerol during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

GLYCEROL Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for GLYCEROL Interactions

GLYCEROL Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

RECTAL:

  • As an adult laxative for constipation: The common dose of glycerol is a 2-3 grams in suppository form or a 5-15 mL enema. For children younger than six years old, the dose is a 1-1.7 grams as a suppository or a 2-5 mL enema.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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