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ROYAL JELLY

Other Names:

Apis mellifera, Bee Saliva, Bee Spit, Gelée Royale, Honey Bee Milk, Honey Bee's Milk, Jalea Real, Lait des Abeilles, Royal Bee Jelly.

 Overview
 Uses
 Side Effects
 Interactions
 Dosing
Overview Information

Royal jelly is a milky secretion produced by worker honey bees. It typically contains about 60% to 70% water, 12% to 15% proteins, 10% to 16% sugar, 3% to 6% fats, and 2% to 3% vitamins, salts, and amino acids. Its composition varies depending on geography and climate. This product gets its name from the fact that bees use it for the development and nurturing of queen bees. Some people use royal jelly as medicine. Don’t confuse royal jelly with bee pollen or bee venom.

Royal jelly is used for asthma, hay fever, liver disease, pancreatitis, sleep troubles (insomnia), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), stomach ulcers, kidney disease, bone fractures, menopausal symptoms, skin disorders, and high cholesterol. It is also used as a general health tonic, for fighting the effects of aging, and for boosting the immune system.

Some people apply royal jelly directly to the skin as a tonic or to the scalp to encourage hair growth.

How does it work?

There is very little scientific information available about the effects of royal jelly in people. In animals, royal jelly seems to have some activity against tumors and the development of “hardening of the arteries.”

Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Menopausal symptoms. Some research shows that taking a specific product containing royal jelly and flower pollen (Melbrosia) by mouth for 12 weeks can reduce menopausal symptoms and improve feelings of well-being in menopausal women. Another specific product containing royal jelly, evening primrose oil, damiana, and ginseng (Lady 4) may also decrease menopausal symptoms.

Possibly Ineffective for:

  • Seasonal allergies (hayfever). Taking a specific royal jelly product (Bidro) by mouth for 3-6 months before and during pollen season does not seem to improve nasal congestion, sneezing, or eye discomfort in children with hayfever.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Diabetic foot ulcers. Early research shows that applying a specific ointment containing royal jelly and panthenol (Pediphar) for up to 6 months after cleansing and removal of dead tissue may improve the healing of diabetic foot ulcers.
  • Infertility. Early research shows that applying a solution containing royal jelly, Egyptian bee honey, and bee bread to the vagina for 2 weeks may increase the rate of pregnancy in couples with fertility problems due to reduced sperm movement (asthenozoospermia).
  • High cholesterol. Early research suggests that injecting royal jelly, or taking royal jelly under the tongue or by mouth for 2-11 weeks, might lower cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol.
  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) . Early research shows that taking a specific product (Femal, Natumin Pharma) containing royal jelly, bee pollen extract, and bee pollen with pistil extract by mouth for 2 menstrual cycles seems to decrease certain symptoms of PMS including irritability, weight increases, and swelling.
  • Asthma.
  • Liver disease.
  • Pancreatitis.
  • Trouble sleeping (insomnia) .
  • Stomach ulcers.
  • Kidney disease.
  • Bone fractures.
  • Skin disorders.
  • Baldness.
  • Boosting immunity.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of royal jelly for these uses.

Side Effects & Safety

Royal jelly is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth appropriately. A specific product containing a combination of royal jelly, bee pollen extract, and bee pollen plus pistol extract (Femal by Natumin Pharma) has been used safely for up to 2 months. Another combination product containing royal jelly and flower pollen (Melbrosia) has been used safely for up to 3 months. Royal jelly might cause serious allergic reactions including asthma, swelling of the throat, and death. Rarely, it might cause the colon to bleed, accompanied by stomach pain and bloody diarrhea.

Royal jelly is also POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin appropriately. However, it has caused inflammation and allergic rash when applied to the scalp.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Royal jelly is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth for up to 6 months.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of using royal jelly if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Asthma or allergies: Don’t use royal jelly if you have asthma or allergies to bee products. It could cause some serious reactions, even death.

Inflamed skin (dermatitis): Royal jelly might make dermatitis worse.

Low blood pressure: Royal jelly might lower blood pressure. If your blood pressure is already low, taking royal jelly might make it drop too much.

Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with ROYAL JELLY

    Royal jelly might increase the effects of warfarin (Coumadin). Taking royal jelly with warfarin (Coumadin) might result in an increased chance of bruising or bleeding.


Dosing

The appropriate dose of royal jelly depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for royal jelly. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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