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DEANOL

Other Names:

2-Dimethyl Aminoethanol, 2-Dimethylaminoethanol, Acéglumate de Déanol, Acétamido-benzoate de Déanol, Benzilate de Déanol, Bisorcate de Déanol, Cyclohexylpropionate de Déanol, Déanol, Deanol Aceglumate, Deanol Acetamidobenzoate, Deanol Benzilate,...
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DEANOL Overview
DEANOL Uses
DEANOL Side Effects
DEANOL Interactions
DEANOL Dosing
DEANOL Overview Information

Deanol is a chemical that is involved in a series of reactions that form acetylcholine, a chemical that is found in the brain and other areas of the body. Acetylcholine is a “neurotransmitter” that helps nerve cells communicate.

Deanol is used for treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Alzheimer’s disease, autism, and a movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia. It is also used for improving memory and mood; boosting thinking skills and intelligence; and increasing physical energy, oxygen efficiency, athletic performance, and muscle reflexes. It is also used for preventing aging or liver spots, improving red blood cell function, and extending life span.

Deanol is applied to the skin for reducing signs of aging, particularly loose or sagging skin.

Deanol was previously sold by Riker Laboratories as the prescription drug Deaner. It was prescribed for the management of children with behavior problems and learning difficulties. Deanol is not an approved food additive in the U.S., nor is it an orphan drug, as some advertising suggests.

How does it work?

Deanol is needed to build the chemical choline. Having more choline in the body might increase the production of acetylcholine, which is involved in brain and nervous system function.

DEANOL Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Improving exercise performance (when used with ginseng, vitamins, and minerals).

Likely Ineffective for:

  • Alzheimer's disease.
  • Unwanted movements of the face and mouth (tardive dyskinesia).

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Treating aging skin. There is some early evidence that applying a 3% deanol gel to facial skin can tighten sagging skin.
  • Treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Improving memory and mood.
  • Improving intelligence and physical energy.
  • Preventing aging or liver spots.
  • Improving red blood cell function.
  • Improving muscle reflexes.
  • Increasing oxygen efficiency.
  • Extending life span.
  • Treating autism.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of deanol for these uses.


DEANOL Side Effects & Safety

Deanol is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth or applied to the skin.

When taken by mouth, deanol can cause constipation, itching, headache, drowsiness, insomnia, excitation, vivid dreams, confusion, depression, increased blood pressure, an increase in schizophrenia symptoms, and unwanted movements of the face and mouth.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of deanol during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Clonic-tonic seizures: Deanol should not be used by people with clonic-tonic seizure disorders.

Depression: Deanol might make depression worse.

Schizophrenia: Deanol might make schizophrenia symptoms worse.

DEANOL Interactions What is this?

Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination

  • Drying medications (Anticholinergic drugs) interacts with DEANOL

    Some drying medications are called anticholinergic drugs. Deanol might increase chemicals that can decrease the effects of these drying medications.

    Some drying medications include atropine, scopolamine, and some medications used for allergies (antihistamines), and for depression (antidepressants).

  • Medications for Alzheimer's disease (Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors) interacts with DEANOL

    Deanol might increase a chemical in the body called acetylcholine. Medications for Alzheimer's called acetylcholinesterase inhibitors also increase the chemical acetylcholine. Taking deanol along with medications for Alzheimer's disease might increase effects and side effects of medications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Some medications called acetylcholinesterase inhibitors include donepezil (Aricept), tacrine (Cognex), rivastigmine (Exelon), and galantamine (Reminyl, Razadyne).

  • Various medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions (Cholinergic drugs) interacts with DEANOL

    Deanol might increase a chemical in the body called acetylcholine. This chemical is similar to some medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions. Taking deanol with these medications might increase the chance of side effects.

    Some of these medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions include pilocarpine (Pilocar and others), and others.


DEANOL Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For improving exercise performance: 300 to 2000 mg of deanol per day.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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