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ANISE

Other Names:

Anis, Anís, Anis Vert, Aniseed, Anise Essential Oil, Anisi Fructus, Graine d’Anis Vert, Huile Essentielle d’Anis, Phytoestrogen, Phyto-Œstrogène, Pimpinella anisum, Pinella, Semen Anisi, Shatpushpa, Sweet Cumin, Velaiti Saunf.

CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Overview
CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Uses
CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Side Effects
CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Interactions
CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Dosing
CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Overview Information

Anise is an herb. The seed (fruit) and oil, and less frequently the root and leaf, are used to make medicine.

Anise is used for upset stomach, intestinal gas, “runny nose,” and as an expectorant to increase productive cough, as a diuretic to increase urine flow, and as an appetite stimulant. Women use anise to increase milk flow when nursing, start menstruation, treat menstrual discomfort or pain, ease childbirth, and increase sex drive. Men use anise to treat symptoms of “male menopause.” Other uses include treatment of seizures, nicotine dependence, trouble sleeping (insomnia), asthma, and constipation.

Some people apply anise directly to the skin to treat lice, scabies, and psoriasis.

In foods, anise is used as a flavoring agent. It has a sweet, aromatic taste that resembles the taste of black licorice. It is commonly used in alcohols and liqueurs, such as anisette and ouzo. Anise is also used in dairy products, gelatins, meats, candies, and breath fresheners.

In manufacturing, anise is often used as a fragrance in soap, creams, perfumes, and sachets.

How does it work?

There are chemicals in anise that may have estrogen-like effects. Chemicals in anise may also act as insecticides.

CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Menstrual discomfort. Some clinical research shows that taking a specific product containing anise, saffron, and celery seed (SCA, Gol Daro Herbal Medicine Laboratory) reduces pain severity and duration during the menstrual cycle.

Insufficient Evidence for:

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of anise for these uses.


CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Side Effects & Safety

Anise is safe for most people including children in the amounts typically found in foods. It also appears to be safe when applied to the scalp in combination with other herbs. There isn't enough information available to know if anise is safe to take by mouth in medicinal amounts.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Anise is safe for pregnant and breast-feeding women when used as part of a normal diet. But it’s not known whether it’s safe to use anise in larger medicinal amounts during pregnancy or breast-feeding. Stick to food amounts.

Hormone-sensitive condition such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Anise might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use anise.

CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with ANISE

    Some birth control pills contain estrogen. Anise might have some of the same effects as estrogen. But anise isn't as strong as the estrogen in birth control pills. Taking anise along with birth control pills might decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. If you take birth control pills along with anise, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom.
    Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.

  • Estrogens interacts with ANISE

    Large amounts of anise might have some of the same effects as estrogen. But large amounts of anise aren't as strong as estrogen pills. Taking anise along with estrogen pills might decrease the effects of estrogen pills.
    Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

  • Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) interacts with ANISE

    Some types of cancer are affected by hormones in the body. Estrogen-sensitive cancers are cancers that are affected by estrogen levels in the body. Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) is used to help treat and prevent these types of cancer. Anise seems to also affect estrogen levels in the body. By affecting estrogen in the body, anise might decrease the effectiveness of tamoxifen (Nolvadex). Do not take anise if you are taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex).


CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For menstrual discomfort: 500 mg of a specific combination product containing saffron, celery seed, and anise extracts (SCA, Gol Daro Herbal Medicine Laboratory) taken three times a day for the first three days of menstruation.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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