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OREGANO

Other Names:

Carvacrol, Dostenkraut, European Oregano, Huile d’Origan, Marjolaine Bâtarde, Marjolaine Sauvage, Marjolaine Vivace, Mediterranean Oregano, Mountain Mint, Oil of Oregano, Oregano Oil, Organy, Origan, Origan Européen, Origani Vulgaris Herba, Orig...
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OREGANO Overview
OREGANO Uses
OREGANO Side Effects
OREGANO Interactions
OREGANO Dosing
OREGANO Overview Information

Oregano is a plant. The leaf is used to make medicine.

Oregano is used for respiratory tract disorders such as coughs, asthma, croup, and bronchitis. It is also used for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders such as heartburn and bloating. Other uses include treating menstrual cramps, rheumatoid arthritis, urinary tract disorders including urinary tract infections (UTIs), headaches, and heart conditions.

The oil of oregano is taken by mouth for intestinal parasites, allergies, sinus pain, arthritis, cold and flu, swine flu, earaches, and fatigue. It is applied to the skin for skin conditions including acne, athlete's foot, oily skin, dandruff, canker sores, warts, ringworm, rosacea, and psoriasis; as well as for insect and spider bites, gum disease, toothaches, muscle pain, and varicose veins. Oregano oil is also used topically as an insect repellent.

In foods and beverages, oregano is used as a culinary spice and a food preservative.

How does it work?

Oregano contains chemicals that might help reduce cough and spasms. Oregano also might help digestion by increasing bile flow and fighting against some bacteria, viruses, fungi, intestinal worms, and other parasites.

OREGANO Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Parasites in the intestines. Taking oil of oregano for 6 weeks can kill the parasites Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba hartmanni, and Endolimax nana.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Repelling insects. Oregano oil has been tested as an insect repellent for Culicoides imicola, a disease-bearing species of insect commonly known as “no-see-ums” or biting midges. Oregano oil is not as effective as DEET for protecting horses (and presumably, people) from this pest.
  • Asthma.
  • Bronchitis.
  • Cough.
  • Flu.
  • Indigestion and bloating.
  • Painful menstrual periods.
  • Arthritis.
  • Headaches.
  • Heart conditions.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate oregano for these uses.


OREGANO Side Effects & Safety

Oregano leaf is LIKELY SAFE when taken in the amounts found in food and POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or applied to the skin in medicinal amounts. Mild side effects include stomach upset. Oregano might also cause an allergic reaction in people who have an allergy to plants in the Lamiaceae family.

Not enough is known about the safety of using oregano oil in medicinal amounts.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Oregano is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts during pregnancy. There is concern that oregano in amounts larger than food amounts might cause miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of oregano when used in medicinal amounts while nursing.

Allergies: Oregano can cause reactions in people allergic to Lamiaceae family plants, including basil, hyssop, lavender, marjoram, mint, and sage.

OREGANO Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Lithium interacts with OREGANO

    Oregano might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking oregano might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.


OREGANO Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For intestinal parasites: 200 mg of oil of oregano three times daily for 6 weeks.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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