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GREATER CELANDINE

Other Names:

Bai Qu Cai, Celandine, Celandine Herb, Celandine Root, Celidonia Mayor, Chelidonii, Chelidonii Herba, Chelidonium majus, Grande Chélidoine, Grande Éclaire, Greater Celandine Above Ground Parts, Greater Celandine Rhizome, Greater Celandine Root, ...
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GREATER CELANDINE Overview
GREATER CELANDINE Uses
GREATER CELANDINE Side Effects
GREATER CELANDINE Interactions
GREATER CELANDINE Dosing
GREATER CELANDINE Overview Information

Greater celandine is a plant. The dried above-ground parts, root, and rhizome (underground stem) are used to make medicine. Don’t confuse greater celandine with lesser celandine (Family: Ranunculus ficaria).

Greater celandine is used for various problems with the digestive tract including upset stomach, gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), constipation, loss of appetite, stomachcancer, intestinal polyps, and liver and gallbladder disorders. Other uses include detoxification, treating menstrual cramps, cough, pain, breast lumps, chest pain (angina), fluid retention (edema), “hardening of the arteries” (arteriosclerosis), high blood pressure, asthma, gout, and osteoarthritis.

Some people apply greater celandine directly to the skin for warts, genital warts, rashes, eczema, and scabies; and to the gums for tooth pain and to ease tooth extraction. The fresh root is also chewed to relieve toothache.

How does it work?

The chemicals in greater celandine might slow the growth of cancer cells, but might also be harmful to normal cells. Preliminary research suggests greater celandine might increase the flow of bile. Greater celandine might also have some pain-relieving properties.

GREATER CELANDINE Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Upset stomach (dyspepsia), when a combination of greater celandine and several other herbs is used. The combination (Iberogast, Medical Futures, Inc) includes greater celandine plus peppermint leaf, German chamomile, caraway, licorice, clown's mustard plant, lemon balm, angelica, and milk thistle. Research suggests that taking 1 mL of this combination three times daily over a period of 4 weeks significantly reduces severity of acid reflux, stomach pain, cramping, nausea and vomiting.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Cancer. Developing research suggests a specific product, Ukrain, made from greater celandine might be useful for treating various forms of cancer. Some research shows that giving Ukrain intravenously under medical supervision might improve survival of some patients with colorectal, bladder, pancreatic, or breast cancer. But the studies that have shown this benefit have been criticized because they weren’t well designed. Some researchers suggest that doses of Ukrain that are high enough to shrink tumors might be too poisonous for medical use. Ukrain is not available in North America.
  • Warts.
  • Blister rashes.
  • Scabies.
  • Pain and swelling (inflammation).
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Stomach flu.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Gout.
  • Arthritis.
  • Spasms in the digestive tract.
  • Irregular menstrual periods.
  • Toothache.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of greater celandine for these uses.


GREATER CELANDINE Side Effects & Safety

Greater celandine might not be safe when taken by mouth. It can cause serious liver problems. When applied to the skin, greater celandine can cause allergic skin rash.

Not enough is known about the safety of giving greater celandine products intravenously.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of greater celandine during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Blockage of the bile duct (bile duct obstruction): Some greater celandine extracts appear to increase the flow of bile. There is a concern that this might make bile duct obstruction worse.

Liver disease, including hepatitis: There is some evidence that greater celandine can cause hepatitis. Don’t use greater celandine if you have liver disease.

GREATER CELANDINE Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) interacts with GREATER CELANDINE

    Greater celandine might harm the liver. Taking greater celandine along with medication that might also harm the liver can increase the risk of liver damage. Do not take greater celandine if you are taking a medication that can harm the liver.
    Some medications that can harm the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), isoniazid (INH), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), methyldopa (Aldomet), fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), erythromycin (Erythrocin, Ilosone, others), phenytoin (Dilantin) , lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and many others.
    Before taking greater celandine, talk with your healthcare professional if you take any medications.


GREATER CELANDINE Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For upset stomach, 1 mL three times daily of a specific combination product containing greater celandine plus peppermint leaf, German chamomile, caraway, licorice, clown's mustard plant, lemon balm, angelica, and milk thistle. (Iberogast, Medical Futures, Inc) over a period of 4 weeks.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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