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BLADDERWRACK

Other Names:

Alga Noruega o Nudosa, Algue Laminaire, Ascophylle Noueuse, Ascophyllum nodosum, Atlantic Kelp, Black Tang, Bladder Fucus, Bladder Wrack, Blasentang, Chêne Marin, Cutweed, Fucus, Fucus Vésiculeux, Fucus vesiculosis, Goémon, Kelp, Kelpware, Kelp-...
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BLADDERWRACK Overview
BLADDERWRACK Uses
BLADDERWRACK Side Effects
BLADDERWRACK Interactions
BLADDERWRACK Dosing
BLADDERWRACK Overview Information

Bladderwrack is a type of seaweed. People use the whole plant to make medicine.

Bladderwrack is used for many conditions, but, so far, there isn’t enough scientific evidence to determine whether or not it is effective for any of them. It’s also important to note that it’s not safe to take bladderwrack by mouth.

Bladderwrack is used for thyroid disorders including underactive thyroid (myxedema), over-sized thyroid gland (goiter), and iodine deficiency. It is also used for obesity, arthritis, joint pain, “hardening of the arteries” (arteriosclerosis), digestive disorders, heartburn, “blood cleansing,” constipation, bronchitis, emphysema, urinary tract disorders, and anxiety. Other uses include boosting the immune system and increasing energy.

Some people also apply bladderwrack to the skin for skin diseases, burns, aging skin, and insect bites.

Don’t confuse bladderwrack with bladderwort.

How does it work?

Bladderwrack, like many sea plants, contains varying amounts of iodine, which is used to prevent or treat some thyroid disorders. Bladderwrack products may contain varying amounts of iodine, which makes it an inconsistent source of iodine. Bladderwrack also contains algin, which can act as a laxative to help the stool pass through the bowels.

BLADDERWRACK Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Obesity. Early research suggests that bladderwrack, used along with lecithin and vitamins, doesn’t help people lose weight and keep it off.
  • Thyroid problems, including an over-sized thyroid gland (goiter).
  • Iodine deficiency.
  • Arthritis.
  • Achy joints (rheumatism).
  • “Hardening of the arteries” (arteriosclerosis).
  • Digestive problems.
  • “Blood cleansing”.
  • Constipation.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate bladderwrack for these uses.


BLADDERWRACK Side Effects & Safety

Bladderwrack is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. It may contain high concentrations of iodine, which could cause or worsen some thyroid problems. Prolonged, high intake of dietary iodine is linked with goiter and increased risk of thyroid cancer. Treatment of thyroid problems should not be attempted without medical supervision.

Like other sea plants, bladderwrack can concentrate toxic heavy metals, such as arsenic, from the water in which it lives.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Bladderwrack is LIKELY UNSAFE during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Don’t use it.

Thyroid problems known as hyperthyroidism (too much thyroid hormone), or hypothyroidism (too little thyroid hormone): Bladderwrack contains significant amounts of iodine, which might make hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism worse. Don’t use it.

Infertility: Preliminary research suggests that taking bladderwrack might make it harder for women to get pregnant.

Iodine allergy: Bladderwrack contains significant amounts of iodine, which could cause an allergic reaction in sensitive people. Don’t use it.

Surgery: Bladderwrack might slow blood clotting. There is a concern that it might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking bladderwrack at least 2 weeks before surgery.

BLADDERWRACK Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications for an overactive thyroid (Antithyroid drugs) interacts with BLADDERWRACK

    Bladderwrack can contains significant amounts of iodine. Iodine can affect the thyroid. Taking iodine along with medications for an overactive thyroid might decrease the thyroid too much. Do not take bladderwrack if you are taking medications for an overactive thyroid.

    Some of these medications include methenamine mandelate (Methimazole), methimazole (Tapazole), potassium iodide (Thyro-Block), and others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with BLADDERWRACK

    Bladderwrack might slow blood clotting. Taking bladderwrack along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.


BLADDERWRACK Dosing

The appropriate dose of bladderwrack depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bladderwrack. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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