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GOTU KOLA

Other Names:

Brahma-Buti, Brahma-Manduki, Centellase, Centella asiatica, Centella Asiática, Centella Asiatique, Centella coriacea, Divya, Gota Kola, Hydrocotyle asiatica, Hydrocotyle Asiatique, Hydrocotyle Indien, Indischer Wassernabel, Indian Pennywort, Ind...
See All Names

Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Overview
Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Uses
Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Side Effects
Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Interactions
Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Dosing
Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Overview Information

Gotu kola is an herb that is commonly used in Traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. The above-ground parts are used to make medicine.

Gotu kola is used to treat bacterial, viral, or parastitic infections such as urinary tract infection (UTI), shingles, leprosy, cholera, dysentery, syphilis, the common cold, influenza, H1N1 (swine) flu, elephantiasis, tuberculosis, and schistosomiasis.

Gotu kola is also used for fatigue, anxiety, depression, psychiatric disorders, Alzheimer's disease, and improving memory and intelligence. Other uses include wound healing, trauma, and circulation problems (venous insufficiency) including varicose veins, and blood clots in the legs.

Some people use gotu kola for sunstroke, tonsillitis, fluid around the lungs (pleurisy), liver disease (hepatitis), jaundice, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), stomach pain, diarrhea, indigestion, stomach ulcers, epilepsy, asthma, “tired blood” (anemia), diabetes, and for helping them live longer.

Some women use gotu kola for preventing pregnancy, absence of menstrual periods, and to arouse sexual desire.

Gotu kola is sometimes applied to the skin for wound healing and reducing scars, includiung stretch marks caused by pregnancy.

How does it work?

Gotu kola contains certain chemicals that seem to decrease inflammation and also decrease blood pressure in veins. Gotu kola also seems to increase collagen production, which is important for wound healing.

Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Decreased return of blood from the feet and legs back to the heart (venous insufficiency).

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Preventing blood clots in the legs while flying. Gotu kola might help prevent blood clots related to long plane flights. Developing evidence suggests that gotu kola might decrease fluid and improve blood circulation in people traveling on airplanes for more than 3 hours, but it’s not known if this fnding translates into fewer blood clots.
  • Increasing circulation in people with diabetes. Taking gotu kola for 6-12 months might help increase circulation and decrease fluid retention in people with diabetes whose small blood vessels have been damaged by their disease.
  • Stabilizing "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis). People with atherosclerosis have fatty deposits called plagues along the lining of their blood vessels. There is some evidence that taking gotu kola for 12 months might help “stabilize” these plaques so they are less likely to break off and trigger clot formation, causing a heart attack or stroke.
  • Stretch marks associated with pregnancy. Early research suggests that applying a specific mixture of gotu kola, vitamin E, and a collagen compound in a cream (Trofolastin, not available in the U.S.) daily during the last six months of pregnancy might reduce stretch marks. There is also some evidence that another specific mixture of gotu kola, vitamin E, essential fatty acids, hyaluronic acid, elastin, and menthol in an ointment (Verum, not available in the U.S.) might help prevent stretch marks during pregnancy.
  • Schistosomiasis. There is some evidence that gotu kola injected by a healthcare provider might help bladder wounds caused by a parasitic infection called schistosomiasis.
  • Wound healing. Some evidence suggests that applying gotu kola on the skin might help improve wound healing.
  • Psoriasis (a skin condition). Some evidence suggests that applying gotu kola on the skin might help reduce symptoms of psoriasis.
  • Fatigue.
  • Anxiety.
  • Common cold and flu.
  • Sunstroke.
  • Tonsillitis.
  • Urinary tract infection (UTI).
  • Hepatitis.
  • Jaundice.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Indigestion.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of gotu kola for these uses.


Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Side Effects & Safety

Gotu kola is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or applied to the skin appropriately. However, there is concern that gotu kola might cause liver damage in some people. It can also cause other side effects including stomach upset, nausea, and itching. Too much gotu kola might also cause drowsiness.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Gotu kola is POSSIBLY SAFE in pregnant women when applied to the skin. But don’t take it by mouth. Not enough is known about the safety of taking gotu kola orally. There also isn’t enough known about the safety of using gotu kola during breast-feeding. Avoid using it if you are nursing.

Liver disease: There is concern that gotu kola might cause liver damage. People who already have a liver disease such as hepatitis should avoid using gotu kola. It might make liver problems worse.

Surgery: Gotu kola might cause too much sleepiness if combined with medications used during and after surgery. Stop using gotu kola at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Interactions What is this?

Major Interaction Do not take this combination

  • Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with GOTU KOLA

    Large amounts of gotu kola might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking gotu kola along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

    Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others.


Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) interacts with GOTU KOLA

    Gotu kola might harm the liver. Taking gotu kola along with medication that might also harm the liver can increase the risk of liver damage.

    Some medications that can harm the liver include acetaminophen (Tylenol and others), amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), isoniazid (INH), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), methyldopa (Aldomet), fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), erythromycin (Erythrocin, Ilosone, others), phenytoin (Dilantin), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol), simvastatin (Zocor), and many others.


Centella asiatica (GOTU KOLA) Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For blood circulation problems in the legs (venous insufficiency): 60-180 mg daily of gotu kola extract.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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