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RNA AND DNA

Other Names:

Acide Désoxyribonucléique, Acide Nucléique, Acides Nucléiques, ADN, ADN-ARN, ADN/ARN, ARN et ADN, ARN y ADN, DNA, Deoxynucleic Acid, Deoxyribonucleic Acid, Extrait Ribonucléique, Nuclei Acids, Nucleic, Nucleic Acid, Nucleic Acids, Nucleotides, N...
See All Names

RNA AND DNA Overview
RNA AND DNA Uses
RNA AND DNA Side Effects
RNA AND DNA Interactions
RNA AND DNA Dosing
RNA AND DNA Overview Information

RNA (ribonucleic acid) and DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) are chemical compounds that can be made by the body. They can also be made in a laboratory. RNA and DNA are used as medicine.

People take RNA/DNA combinations to improve memory and mental sharpness, treat or prevent Alzheimer's disease, treat depression, increase energy, tighten skin, increase sex drive, and counteract the effects of aging.

In the hospital, RNA is used in nutrition formulas that include omega-3 fatty acids and arginine. The combination is used for reducing the time needed for recovery after surgery, boosting the immune system’s response, and improving outcomes for burn patients and intensive care patients.

As a shot, RNA is used to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis, as well as hives and shingles.

How does it work?

RNA (ribonucleic acid) and DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) are chemicals called nucleotides that are made by the body. They appear to be essential under conditions of rapid growth such as intestinal development, liver surgery or injury, and also during challenges to the immune system.

RNA AND DNA Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Shortening recovery from surgery or illness. Supplementing the diet of patients undergoing major surgery with RNA, L-arginine, and eicosapentaenoic acid might improve recovery. Giving this combination around the time of surgery appears to boost immune response, reduce infections, improve wound healing, and shorten recovery time.

Possibly Ineffective for:

  • Burn injury recovery.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Alzheimer's disease.
  • Improving memory.
  • Depression.
  • Sagging skin.
  • Decreased sex drive.
  • Aging.
  • Eczema, when given as a shot.
  • Psoriasis, when given as a shot.
  • Hives, when given as a shot.
  • Shingles, when given as a shot.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of RNA and DNA for these uses.


RNA AND DNA Side Effects & Safety

RNA appears to be safe for most people when taken along with omega-3 fatty acids and L-arginine or injected under the skin. Injections can cause itching, redness, and swelling at the injection site.

Infant formulas that contain RNA or DNA also seem to be safe for children.

There isn’t enough information to know whether RNA/DNA combinations are safe to take by mouth.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It might be UNSAFE to take RNA and DNA as a supplement if you are pregnant. Some evidence suggests that DNA might cross the placenta and cause birth defects.

Not enough is known about the safety of using RNA and DNA if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

RNA AND DNA Interactions What is this?

We currently have no information for RNA AND DNA Interactions

RNA AND DNA Dosing

The following dose has been studied in scientific research:

BY FEEDING TUBE:

  • For improving surgical recovery: 30 mg/kg/day of RNA along with arginine and omega-3 fatty acids.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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