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ROSE HIP

Other Names:

Apothecary Rose, Cynorhodon, Cynorhodons, Cynosbatos, Dog Rose, Dog Rose Hips, Églantier, Fruit de l’Églantier, Gulab, Heps, Hip, Hip Fruit, Hip Sweet, Hipberry, Hop Fruit, Persian Rose, Phool Gulab, Pink Rose, Poire d’oiseaux, Rosa alba, Rosa c...
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ROSE HIP Overview
ROSE HIP Uses
ROSE HIP Side Effects
ROSE HIP Interactions
ROSE HIP Dosing
ROSE HIP Overview Information

Rose hips are the round portion of the rose flower just below the petals. Rose hips contain the seeds of the rose plant. Dried rose hips and the seeds are used together to make medicine.

Fresh rose hips contain a lot of vitamin C, so they share many uses with vitamin C including preventing and treating colds, flu, and vitamin C deficiencies. However, much of the vitamin C in rose hips is destroyed during drying and processing and also declines rapidly during storage. Because of this, many rose hip-derived "natural" vitamin C products have actually been fortified with lab-made vitamin C, but their labels may not always say so.

Rose hips are also used for stomach disorders including stomach spasms, stomach acid deficiency, preventing stomach irritation and ulcers, and as a "stomach tonic" for intestinal diseases. They are also used for diarrhea, constipation, gallstones, gallbladder ailments, lower urinary tract and kidney disorders, fluid retention (dropsy or edema), gout, back and leg pain (sciatica), diabetes, high cholesterol, weight loss, high blood pressure, chest ailments, fever, increasing immune function during exhaustion, increasing blood flow in the limbs, increasing urine flow and quenching thirst.

In foods and in manufacturing, rose hips are used for tea, jam, soup, and as a natural source of vitamin C.

How does it work?

Some people use rose hip as a source of vitamin C. It is true that fresh rose hip contains vitamin C. But processing and drying of the plant destroys most of the vitamin C.

ROSE HIP Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Obesity. Some research shows that taking rose hips powder mixed with apple juice does not affect weight or blood sugar levels in the body in people who are obese. However, rose hip might modestly reduce cholesterol and blood pressure in obese people.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. There is preliminary research showing that taking a specific rose hip product (LitoZin/i-flex, HybenVital, Denmark) by mouth might improve some symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Preventing and treating colds.
  • Infections.
  • Fever.
  • Boosting the immune system.
  • Stomach irritations.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate rose hip for these uses.


ROSE HIP Side Effects & Safety

Rose hip is LIKELY SAFE for adults in food amount and POSSIBLY SAFE in medicinal amounts. Rose hip can cause some side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, stomach cramps, fatigue, headache, inability to sleep, and others. Inhaling rose hip dust can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of rose hip during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using amounts larger than those found in food.

Diabetes: The vitamin C in rose hip might affect the control of diabetes, but not all experts agree on this.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD deficiency): Large amounts of the vitamin C in rose hip might increase the risk of complications.

Iron-related disorders such as hemochromatosis, thalassemia, or anemia: Use rose hip with caution if you have any of these conditions. The vitamin C in rose hip can increase iron absorption, which could make your condition worse.

Sickle cell disease: It’s rare, but the vitamin C in rose hip might make blood more acidic, and this could bring on a sickle cell crisis. It’s best to avoid use.

ROSE HIP Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Aluminum interacts with ROSE HIP

    Aluminum is found in most antacids. Rose hips contain vitamin C. Vitamin C can increase how much aluminum the body absorbs. But it isn't clear if this interaction is a big concern. Take rose hip two hours before or four hours after antacids.

  • Estrogens interacts with ROSE HIP

    Rose hip contains a large amount of vitamin C. Vitamin C can increase how much estrogen the body absorbs. Taking rose hip along with estrogen can increase the effects and side effects of estrogens.

    Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

  • Fluphenazine (Prolixin) interacts with ROSE HIP

    Rose hip contains vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might increase how quickly the body gets rid of fluphenazine (Prolixin). Taking rose hip along with fluphenazine (Prolixin) might decrease the effectiveness of fluphenazine (Prolixin).

  • Lithium interacts with ROSE HIP

    Rose hip might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking rose hip might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with ROSE HIP

    Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Rose hip contains vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.


Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination

  • Aspirin interacts with ROSE HIP

    The body breaks down aspirin to get rid of it. Rose hip contains large amounts of vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might decrease the breakdown of aspirin. Taking large amount of rose hip along with aspirin might increase the effects and side effects of aspirin. Do not take large amounts of vitamin C if you take large amounts of aspirin.

  • Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate) interacts with ROSE HIP

    Rose hip contains vitamin C. Vitamin C might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate). But it is not clear if this interaction is a big concern.

  • Salsalate (Disalcid) interacts with ROSE HIP

    Rose hip contains vitamin C. Vitamin C might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of salsalate (Disalcid). Taking rose hip along with salsalate (Disalcid) might increase the effects and side effects of salsalate.


ROSE HIP Dosing

The appropriate dose of rose hip depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for rose hip. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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