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SWEET ORANGE

Other Names:

Bioflavonoid Complex, Bioflavonoid Concentrate, Bioflavonoid Extract, , Bioflavonoïde d’Agrumes, Bioflavonoïdes, Bioflavonoids, Blood Orange, Citri Sinensis, Citrus, Citrus aurantium, Citrus aurantium var. dulcis, Citrus aurantium var. sinensis,...
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SWEET ORANGE Overview
SWEET ORANGE Uses
SWEET ORANGE Side Effects
SWEET ORANGE Interactions
SWEET ORANGE Dosing
SWEET ORANGE Overview Information

Sweet orange is a fruit. The peel and juice are used to make medicine.

The peel of sweet orange is used to increase appetite; reduce phlegm; and treat coughs, colds, intestinal gas (flatulence), acid indigestion (dyspepsia), and cancerous breast sores. It is also used as a tonic.

Sweet orange juice is used for treating kidney stones (nephrolithiasis) and high cholesterol; and preventing high blood pressure and stroke, as well as prostate cancer.

How does it work?

Sweet orange contains large amounts of vitamin C. Some researchers believe sweet orange might help asthma because of the antioxidant activity of vitamin C.

Sweet orange also contains large amounts of potassium. There is evidence that potassium may help prevent high blood pressure and stroke.

Sweet orange fruit and sweet orange juice are used to prevent kidney stones because they contain large amounts of a chemical called citrate. Citrate tends to bind with calcium before it can form kidney stones.

SWEET ORANGE Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • Preventing high blood pressure and stroke. Drinking sweet orange juice seems to help lower the risk of high blood pressure and stroke. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows makers of sweet orange products that provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving and are low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol to make label claims that their product might reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and stroke.
  • Treating high cholesterol. Drinking sweet orange juice helps improve cholesterol levels. In large amounts (750 mL, or about three 8-oz glasses, per day for four weeks), orange juice seems to increase “good” high-density lipoprotein and reduce the ratio of “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to HDL cholesterol in people with high cholesterol.

Possibly Ineffective for:


Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Asthma. There is some evidence that sweet orange and other fruits that are rich in vitamin C might improve lung function in people with asthma. But not all studies agree.
  • Colds. Some research shows that drinking 180 mL (about 6 ounces) of sweet orange juice daily might help prevent symptoms of the common cold.
  • Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis). Some research reports that drinking 400 mL of sweet orange juice (about 13 ounces) increases the amount of citrate in the urine. This might help to prevent kidney stones that are made of calcium.
  • Coughs.
  • Eating disorders.
  • Cancerous breast sores.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of sweet orange for these uses.


SWEET ORANGE Side Effects & Safety

Sweet orange seems to be safe for most adults.

In children, taking large amounts of sweet orange peel is UNSAFE. It can cause colic, convulsions, or death.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Sweet orange seems safe when taken in usual food amounts.

SWEET ORANGE Interactions What is this?

Major Interaction Do not take this combination

  • Celiprolol (Celicard) interacts with SWEET ORANGE

    Consuming large amounts of sweet orange juice might decrease how much celiprolol (Celicard) the body absorbs. This might decrease how well celiprolol (Celicard) works. Don't consume large amounts of sweet orange juice if you take celiprolol (Celicard).

  • Ivermectin interacts with SWEET ORANGE

    Drinking sweet orange juice might decrease how much ivermectin the body absorbs. Taking sweet orange along with ivermectin might decrease the effectiveness of ivermectin.

  • Pravastatin (Pravachol) interacts with SWEET ORANGE

    Drinking sweet orange juice might increase how much pravastatin (Pravachol) the body absorbs. Taking pravastatin (Pravachol) with sweet orange juice might increase drug levels in the body and possibly increase the chance of drug side effects.


Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics) interacts with SWEET ORANGE

    Calcium-fortified sweet orange juice can reduce the amount of some antibiotics the body absorbs. Reduced absorption of antibiotics can reduce their ability to fight infection. Sweet orange juice without calcium is unlikely to affect quinolone antibiotics.

    Some quinolone antibiotics include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), and trovafloxacin (Trovan).

  • Fexofenadine (Allegra) interacts with SWEET ORANGE

    Sweet orange might decrease how much fexofenadine (Allegra) the body absorbs. Taking sweet orange along with fexofenadine (Allegra) might decrease the effectiveness of fexofenadine (Allegra).

  • Medications moved by pumps in cells (P-Glycoprotein substrates) interacts with SWEET ORANGE

    Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. Sweet orange might change how these pumps work and change how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. There is not enough information to know how important this interaction might be. Until more is known sweet orange juice should be used cautious with medications moved by these pumps.

    Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.


SWEET ORANGE Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For high cholesterol: 750 mL sweet orange juice per day.
  • For high blood pressure and stroke prevention: Sweet orange juice products that provide at least 350 mg of potassium per serving and are low in sodium, saturated fat, and cholesterol are permitted by the FDA to make labeling claims that they might reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure and stroke.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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