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CRANBERRY

Other Names:

Agrio, Airelle à Gros Fruits, Airelle Canneberge, Airelle Européenne, Airelle Rouge, American Cranberry, Arándano, Arándano Americano, Arándano Rojo, Arándano Trepador, Atoca, Atoka, Bearberry, Canneberge, Canneberge à Feuillage Persistant, Cann...
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CRANBERRY Overview
CRANBERRY Uses
CRANBERRY Side Effects
CRANBERRY Interactions
CRANBERRY Dosing
CRANBERRY Overview Information

Cranberry is a small, evergreen shrub grown throughout North America. Cranberry has a long history of use among native American Indian tribes, primarily for treating urinary conditions. Juice and extracts from the fruit (berry) are used as medicine.

Cranberry is most commonly used for prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Cranberry JUICE seems to help prevent UTIs, but so far it doesn’t seem to be effective in treating UTIs.

Cranberry is also used for neurogenic bladder (a bladder disease), as well as to deodorize urine in people with urinary incontinence (difficulty controlling urination). Some people use cranberry to increase urine flow, kill germs, speed skin healing, and reduce fever.

Some people use cranberry for type 2 diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), scurvy, inflammation of the lining around the lung (pleurisy), and cancer.

In foods, cranberry fruit is used in cranberry juice, cranberry juice cocktail, jelly, and sauce. Cranberry juice cocktail is approximately 26% to 33% pure cranberry juice, sweetened with fructose or artificial sweetener.

How does it work?

People used to think that cranberry worked for urinary tract infections by making the urine acidic and, therefore, unlikely to support the growth of bacteria. But researchers don’t believe this explanation any more. They now think that some of the chemicals in cranberries keep bacteria from sticking to the cells that line the urinary tract where they can multiply. Cranberry, however, does not seem to have the ability to release bacteria which are already stuck to these cells. This may explain why cranberry is possibly effective in preventing urinary tract infections, but possibly ineffective in treating them.

Cranberry, as well as many other fruits and vegetables, contains significant amounts of salicylic acid, which is an important ingredient in aspirin. Drinking cranberry juice regularly increases the amount of salicylic acid in the body. Salicylic acid can reduce swelling, prevent blood clots, and can have antitumor effects.

CRANBERRY Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Effective for:

  • PREVENTING urinary tract infections (UTIs). Research shows that drinking cranberry juice cocktail can help prevent repeated UTIs in older women and pregnant women. Additional research shows that drinking cranberry juice can also help prevent UTIs in hospitalized patients. Some clinical research also supports the use of cranberry-containing capsules for preventing repeated UTIs.

Possibly Ineffective for:


Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Some research shows that taking dried cranberry capsules, three times daily for 6 months, might improve urinary symptoms and lower blood levels of PSA.
  • Reducing urinary odor in people with bladder control problems. Developing research suggests cranberry juice cocktail might be effective for odor control in these people, but cranberry juice must be taken regularly.
  • Skin healing.
  • Pleurisy.
  • Cancer.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate cranberry for these uses.


CRANBERRY Side Effects & Safety

Cranberry is LIKELY SAFE for most people. Cranberry juice and cranberry extracts have been used safely in research. Cranberry juice is LIKELY SAFE for children. But drinking too much cranberry juice can cause some side effects such as mild stomach upset and diarrhea. Drinking more than 1 liter per day for a long period of time might increase the chance of getting kidney stones.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Cranberries and cranberry juice are safe to consume during pregnancy and breast-feeding. But don't use dietary supplements that contain cranberry products. It is not known if these are safe to use during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

Aspirinallergy: Cranberries contain significant amounts of salicylic acid. Salicylic acid is similar to aspirin. Avoid drinking large quantities of cranberry juice if you are allergic to aspirin.

Diabetes: Some cranberry juice products are sweetened with extra sugar. If you have diabetes, stick with cranberry products that are sweetened with artificial sweeteners.

Kidney stones: Cranberry juice and cranberry extracts contain a large amount of a chemical called oxalate. In fact, there is some evidence that some cranberry extract tablets can boost the level of oxalate in the urine by as much as 43%. Since kidney stones are made primarily from oxalate combined with calcium, healthcare providers worry that cranberry might increase the risk of kidney stones. If you have a history of kidney stones, avoid taking cranberry extract products or drinking a lot of cranberry juice.

CRANBERRY Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with CRANBERRY

    Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Cranberry might increase how long warfarin (Coumadin) is in the body, and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.


Minor Interaction Be watchful with this combination

  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) interacts with CRANBERRY

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.

    Cranberry might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking cranberry along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking cranberry, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

    Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), diazepam (Valium), zileuton (Zyflo), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren), fluvastatin (Lescol), glipizide (Glucotrol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), phenytoin (Dilantin), piroxicam (Feldene), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), tolbutamide (Tolinase), torsemide (Demadex), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.


CRANBERRY Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs): Cranberry juice 1-10 oz per day has been used. However, the ideal dose has not yet been determined.
  • For preventing UTIs in children: 15ml/kg daily as 30% cranberry concentrate has been used.
  • For use as a urinary deodorizer for incontinent patients: 3-6 oz per day of cranberry juice.
  • For type 2 diabetes: Six capsules (equivalent to 240 mL cranberry juice cocktail) daily for 12 weeks. Encapsulated formulations are often taken in doses of 300-400 mg twice daily.
Approximately 1500 grams of fresh fruit produces 1 liter of juice. Cranberry juice cocktail is approximately 26% to 33% pure cranberry juice, sweetened with fructose or artificial sweetener.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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