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Prolapsed Bladder

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Symptoms of a Prolapsed Bladder

The first symptom that women with a prolapsed bladder usually notice is the presence of tissue in the vagina that many women describe as something that feels like a ball.

Other symptoms of a prolapsed bladder include the following:

  • Discomfort or pain in the pelvis
  • Tissue protruding from the vagina (The tissue may be tender and may bleed.)
  • Difficulty urinating
  • A feeling that the bladder is not empty immediately after urinating (incomplete voiding)
  • Stress incontinence (urine leakage during sneezing, coughing, or exertion)
  • More frequent bladder infections
  • Painful intercourse (dyspareunia)
  • Low back pain

Some women may not experience or notice symptoms of a mild (grade 1) prolapsed bladder.

When to Seek Medical Care for a Prolapsed Bladder

Any woman who notices symptoms of a prolapsed bladder should see her doctor. A prolapsed bladder is commonly associated with prolapses of other organs within a woman’s pelvis. Thus, timely medical care is recommended to evaluate for and to prevent problematic symptoms and complications caused by weakening tissue and muscle in the vagina. Prolapsed organs cannot heal themselves, and most worsen over time. Several treatments are available to correct a prolapsed bladder.

Exams and Tests for a Prolapsed Bladder

An exam of the female genitalia and pelvis, known as a pelvic exam, is required in order to diagnose a prolapsed bladder. A bladder that has entered the vagina confirms the diagnosis.

For less obvious cases, the doctor may use a voiding cystourethrogram to help with the diagnosis. A voiding cystourethrogram is a series of X-rays that are taken during urination. These help the doctor determine the shape of the bladder and the cause of urinary difficulty. The doctor may also test or take X-rays of different parts of the abdomen to rule out other possible causes of discomfort or urinary difficulty.

After diagnosis, the doctor may test the nerves, muscles, and the intensity of the urine stream to help decide what type of treatment is appropriate.

A test called urodynamics or video urodynamics may be performed at the doctor's discretion. These tests are sometimes referred to as "EKGs of the bladder". Urodynamics measures pressure and volume relationships in the bladder and may be crucial in the decision making of the urologist.

Cystoscopy (looking into the bladder with a scope) may also be performed to identify treatment options. This test is an outpatient office procedure that is sometimes performed on a television screen so the person can see what the urologist sees. Cystoscopy has little risk and is tolerable for the vast majority of people.

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