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Prolapsed Bladder

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Prolapsed Bladder Surgery

Severe prolapsed bladders that cannot be managed with a pessary usually require surgery to correct them. Prolapsed bladder surgery is usually performed through the vagina, and the goal is to secure the bladder in its correct position. The bladder is repaired with an incision in the vaginal wall. The prolapsed area is closed and the wall is strengthened.

Depending on the procedure, surgery can be performed while the woman is under general, regional, or local anesthesia. For smaller surgeries, many women go home the same day of surgery.

Various materials have been used to strengthen pelvic weakness associated with prolapsed bladder. 

The risks of placing mesh through the vagina to repair pelvic organ prolapse may outweigh its benefits, according to the FDA. However, the use of mesh may be appropriate in some situations. A surgeon should explain in detail the risks, benefits, and potential complications of these materials and he or she should explain about the procedure itself before proceeding with the surgery.

After surgery, most women can expect to return to a normal level of activity after six weeks. However, surgeons may recommend reducing or eliminating activities that cause straining for up to six months.

Other Therapy for Prolapsed Bladder

Physical therapy such as electrical stimulation and biofeedback may be used for a prolapsed bladder to help strengthen the muscles in the pelvis. 

  • Electrical stimulation: A doctor can apply a probe to targeted muscles within the vagina or on the pelvic floor. The probe is attached to a device that measures and delivers small electrical currents that contract the muscles. These contractions help strengthen the muscles. A less intrusive type of electrical stimulation is available that magnetically stimulates the pudendal nerve from outside the body. This activates the muscles of the pelvic floor and may help treat incontinence.
  • Biofeedback: A sensor is used to monitor muscle activity in the vagina and on the pelvic floor. The doctor can recommend exercises that can strengthen these muscles. These exercises may help strengthen the muscles to reverse or relieve some symptoms related to a prolapsed bladder. The sensor can monitor the muscular contractions during the exercises, and the doctor may be able to determine if the targeted muscles would benefit from the exercises.
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