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8 Fall Tips for Healthy Living

There's no need to pack on pounds or fall ill this autumn.
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4. Flu Vaccine? Who? You.

As temperatures get chillier and people spend more time indoors, flu season sneaks in. Because the flu virus can infect the lungs, it can cause a serious complication like pneumonia -- which can require hospitalization, even lead to death. That's why certain people must get a flu shot.

October or November is the best time to get vaccinated, but you can still get vaccinated in December or later. Flu season can start as early as October and last as late as May.

If you live with or care for a child under 2 years old, you are in a priority group for flu shots.

There are two types of flu vaccines: flu shots and nasal sprays. The flu shot vaccine is recommended for: 

  • Children aged 6 months to 19 years.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People age 50 and older.
  • People of any age with chronic medical conditions such as asthma.
  • People living in nursing homes or other long-term facilities.

Others who could get Flu Mist nasal spray include healthy people 2-49 years old who are not pregnant.

Also, protect yourself and your child from catching or spreading viruses:

  • Cover nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze or cough. Throw it away afterward.
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water -- especially important after you cough or sneeze on them. Use an alcohol-based hand cleaner if necessary.
  • Keep you and your baby away from people who are coughing or sneezing.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose, or mouth -- since that's how germs are spread

In 2009, the H1N1 swine flu, a new flu virus, emerged. This  virus spreads from person to person like seasonal flu, mainly through coughing or sneezing or sometimes by touching something that became infected with the virus. A vaccine for swine flu is in production. 

 

5. Holiday Game Plan: No Weight Gain

The challenges of holiday feasting are only too obvious -- wonderful smells and fabulous tastes. We do love our comfort food! But the traditional holiday weight gain is another matter. If it's a real problem for you, here's good news. With a few simple changes, you can enjoy the feast without gaining the extra 1 to 3 pounds that tend to become permanent baggage.

Here's your plan:

  • Don't arrive starving. Eat something small and healthy, like oatmeal or a whole-grain sandwich, before the big meal. That will keep you full until dinner.
  • Exercise every day. This means big holidays, too. Get the family out with you. Start a new holiday tradition that involves activity.
  • Establish ground rules with yourself. Eat dessert, but only a sliver, for example.
  • Keep track. Write down everything you eat. If you put it in writing, you're less tempted to overeat.
  • Eat smaller portions of high-calorie dishes. Enjoy, but don't pig out.
  • Save calories for the foods you love. Don't eat something just because it's there.
  • Chat more, eat less. Shun those high-fat appetizers at holiday parties.

If you know you'll have trouble resisting those favorite foods, plan for it. Cut back on eating early in the week. Get more exercise before and after the holidays. You can do this!

Next Article:

What do you like best about autumn?