Skip to content

    Women's Health

    Medical Reference Related to Women's Health

    1. Causes and Symptoms of Chronic Pelvic Pain

      WebMD explains the symptoms of chronic pelvic pain, including the various conditions that may cause it.

    2. What Is Adenomyosis?

      WebMD explains adenomyosis, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

    3. Your Guide to Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

      WebMD explains pelvic inflammatory disease, including the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

    4. Estrogen and Women's Emotions

      Estrogen is linked to mood disruptions that occur only in women -- PMS, PMDD, postpartum depression, and depression linked to menopause. WebMD examines how the hormone may affect emotions.

    5. 5 Common Symptoms of a Yeast Infection

      WebMD explains the symptoms of a vaginal yeast infection.

    6. 8 Questions About Your Period

      WebMD explains menstrual cramping and other discomforts of your period, including which ones may need medical attention.

    7. Normal Testosterone and Estrogen Levels in Women

      WebMD explains normal estrogen and testosterone levels in women -- and how they affect health and mood -- before and after menopause.

    8. Picture of the Thyroid

      WebMD's Thyroid Anatomy Page provides a detailed image of the thyroid as well as a definition and information related to the thyroid. Learn about the conditions that affect this organ as well as its function and location in the body.

    9. Picture of the Breasts

      WebMD discusses the anatomy of the breast including function, a diagram of the breast, conditions that affect the breasts, and much more.

    10. Thyroid Nodules - Topic Overview

      It is not clear whether people who do not have any risk factors and who do not have any symptoms of thyroid problems—which include an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism), thyroid nodules, and thyroid cancer—need to be screened for thyroid problems.The American Thyroid Association recommends that all adults be tested beginning at age 35 and continuing every 5 years.1 After reviewing all of the research, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has not recommended for or against routine thyroid testing.2 Some other groups suggest that people who are at high risk—pregnant women, anyone with a personal or family history of thyroid disease, and people with other autoimmune diseases—may want to be screened. Talk to your doctor about whether you need to be tested for thyroid problems.People who have a family history of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) may want to have a genetic test. Before having the test, it is a good idea

    Displaying 91 - 100 of 525 Articles << Prev Page 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Next >>

    Today on WebMD

    hands on abdomen
    Test your knowledge.
    womans hand on abdomen
    Are you ready for baby?
     
    birth control pills
    Learn about your options.
    insomnia
    Is it menopause or something else?
     
    woman in bathtub
    Slideshow
    period
    VIDEO
     
    bp app on smartwatch and phone
    Slideshow
    estrogen gene
    Quiz
     

    Send yourself a link to download the app.

    Loading ...

    Please wait...

    This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

    Thanks!

    Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

    Blood pressure check
    Slideshow
    hot water bottle on stomach
    Quiz
     
    question
    Assessment
    Attractive young woman standing in front of mirror
    Quiz