Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Women's Health

Font Size

Soy Foods Might Not Protect Against Uterine Cancer

Japanese scientists find no association in large, five-year study

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, June 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There's no evidence that soy foods protect against uterine cancer, a large Japanese study reports.

Soy foods contain isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen that some research suggests may be protective against cancer. But previous studies into how soy foods may affect uterine (endometrial) cancer risk have yielded inconsistent findings.

This new study included more than 49,000 Japanese women who were surveyed twice in five years about their diet, lifestyle, medical history and food consumption of eight soy food items, including miso soup, tofu and soy milk.

After five years, 112 of the women were diagnosed with uterine cancer. But the researchers found no association between higher consumption of soy foods and a lower risk of uterine cancer, according to the study, which was published June 18 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

The researchers noted that the women who consumed more soy foods also ate more fruit and vegetables and tended to be older, more likely to have a history of diabetes, and less likely to be current smokers or to consume alcohol or coffee.

"Our study found that intake of soy and isoflavones were not associated with the risk of endometrial cancer," study co-author Dr. Motoki Iwasaki, of the National Cancer Center in Tokyo, said in a journal news release.

"Although the incidence of endometrial cancer is much lower in Asian countries, the incidence rate has been increasing. We also know that the consumption of soy foods among Japanese people is very high," Iwasaki noted.

"We need further studies with a greater number of cases to verify these findings and add to the research base," the researcher concluded.

John Thorp, journal deputy editor-in-chief, added in the news release, "Confirmation of these results needs further investigation and larger, more diverse studies."

Today on WebMD

hands on abdomen
Test your knowledge.
womans hand on abdomen
Are you ready for baby?
birth control pills
Learn about your options.
Is it menopause or something else?
woman in bathtub
bp app on smartwatch and phone
estrogen gene

Send yourself a link to download the app.

Loading ...

Please wait...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.


Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Blood pressure check
hot water bottle on stomach
Attractive young woman standing in front of mirror