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  • Question 1/9

    Men go through menopause, just like women.

  • Answer 1/9

    Men go through menopause, just like women.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When women start menopause and stop having periods, it’s a dramatic change in hormone levels. And it marks the end of their ability to have children. Men don't have such an abrupt shift in hormone levels, and they can still make sperm. Testosterone levels drop slowly. And as that happens, men may have weight gain, a lack of energy, and less interest in sex.

  • Question 1/9

    Hormones can make you hungry.

  • Answer 1/9

    Hormones can make you hungry.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Two different hormones play big roles in your appetite. One is called ghrelin, and it sends your body the message that it's time to eat. Another called leptin tells you you’re full. Scientists are studying them to learn more about their role in weight loss and obesity.

  • Question 1/9

    Women don’t make testosterone.

  • Answer 1/9

    Women don’t make testosterone.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Testosterone is sometimes called the "male hormone,” but women’s bodies make it too, just less than men. The hormone helps guys get facial and body hair, a deeper voice, and sperm. For women, testosterone seems to play a key role in sex drive.

  • Question 1/9

    Problems with your thyroid can cause you to gain weight.

  • Answer 1/9

    Problems with your thyroid can cause you to gain weight.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your thyroid makes hormones that help control your metabolism -- how fast your body turns food into nutrients and energy. When the gland doesn’t make enough of these hormones, that’s called hypothyroidism. A symptom of it is unexplained weight gain. You’ll need to see a doctor for treatment.

     

  • Answer 1/9

    Many women get headaches when their:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A woman’s levels of estrogen and another hormone called progesterone dip way down right before she gets her period. For some women, that drop can trigger migraine headaches.

  • Question 1/9

    Hormone changes can cause acne.

  • Answer 1/9

    Hormone changes can cause acne.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Many teens get pimples as their hormones rise during puberty. When hormone levels go up, the skin makes more oil. And if oil gets trapped in your pores, it can cause acne. The hormones also cause more bacteria on the skin that can lead to acne. For women, the shift in hormone levels before a period can be a factor. Some women find they have less breakouts when taking birth control pills.

  • Question 1/9

    Hormones can help you sleep.

  • Answer 1/9

    Hormones can help you sleep.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The hormone melatonin lets your body know it’s the right time to catch some ZZZs. You can sleep without it, but people rest better when their bodies are making more of it. Some people who have trouble sleeping or work odd hours take melatonin supplements to help.

     

  • Question 1/9

    Taking human growth hormone (HGH) supplements will reverse the effects of aging.

  • Answer 1/9

    Taking human growth hormone (HGH) supplements will reverse the effects of aging.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you’re looking for the Fountain of Youth, you won’t find it in a bottle. Your body makes HGH, and the FDA has approved lab-made prescription versions of it for children who aren’t growing enough, and for adults who lack growth hormone. But it's not OK for general use. The supplements aren’t regulated, and there’s no proof taking them will make you look or feel younger.

     

  • Question 1/9

    What is the so-called “love hormone”?

  • Answer 1/9

    What is the so-called “love hormone”?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When love is in the air, oxytocin is working in the body. It’s released when we hug or cuddle, and it’s linked to the bonding between mates, and mother and child. It also helps mothers with labor and breastfeeding.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on May 19, 2015 Medically Reviewed on May 19, 2015

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
May 19, 2015

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Hormonal Factors Key to Understanding Acne in Women," "Acne: Who Gets and What Cause," "Acne."

Center for Young Women's  Health: "Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Hormone Headaches Menstrual Migraines." 

HealthyWomen: "The Hormones of Desire."

Hormone Health Network: "What Does Testosterone Do?" "Hypothyroidism Symptoms," "What Does the Thyroid Gland Do?” “Claims About Human Growth Hormone and DHEA.”

KidsHealth.org: "Everything You Wanted to Know About Puberty."

Macedo, D. Appetite , September 2014.

March of Dimes: "What is Oxytocin?"

Obesity Action Coalition: "Ghrelin, the 'Go' Hormone."

UC San Diego News Center: "'Love Hormone' Promotes Bonding."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Melatonin."

UpToDate: "Overview of testosterone deficiency in older men."

Womenshealth.gov: "Men's Health: Older Men."

You and Your Hormones: "Melatonin."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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