Chronic Female Pelvic Pain - Treatment Overview

Treatment for chronic female pelvic pain can be approached in two ways: treating a known, specific cause of the pain or treating the pain itself as a medical condition. When it's possible, your doctor will do both.

Treating a known or suspected cause

Depending on the cause, treatment may include:

Treating the pain itself

Finding a treatment that works may take a while. It's common for women to try many treatments before finding one or more that help.

Medicines that may help manage your pain include:

Counseling and mental skills training, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, help you manage your pain and the stress that makes it worse. For more information, see Other Treatment.

Alternative pain treatments that may help you manage pain include such things as acupuncture and transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS). For more information, see Other Treatment.

If your chronic pain hasn't responded to treatment or seems to have no physical cause, you may have neuropathic pain. This means that your nerves still create pain signals long after an original injury or disease has healed. If your doctor suspects that you have neuropathic pain, he or she may refer you to a pain management clinic for evaluation and treatment.

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What to think about

Decisions are complicated when you are considering treatment for chronic pelvic pain. Think about these questions, and talk to your doctor about them:

  • Are the symptoms bothersome enough to require treatment?
  • Do you want to have a child or more children?
  • Has a specific cause of the pain been discovered? Or is the cause unclear?
  • Is menopause, which may stop symptoms, going to occur soon?
  • Would an opinion from another doctor be helpful?
  • Would an opinion from a doctor who specializes in chronic pain be helpful?

If you are close to menopause (usually around age 50) and your symptoms are likely related to hormones, your best option may be home treatment and medicine while you wait for menopause.

The hormone changes of menopause may get rid of your chronic pain, but the pain may come back if you use hormone therapy. If you are nearing menopause, talk with your doctor about your options.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.

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