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Chronic Female Pelvic Pain - When To Call a Doctor

Call a doctor for immediate care if you have sudden, severe pelvic pain, with or without vaginal bleeding.

Call a doctor if:

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  • Your periods have changed from relatively pain-free to painful.
  • Pain interferes with your daily activities.
  • You start to have pain during intercourse.
  • You have painful urination, blood in your urine, or an inability to control the flow of urine.
  • You have blood in your stool or a significant, unexplained change in your bowel movements.
  • You notice any new pelvic symptoms.
  • You haven't yet seen a doctor about your chronic pelvic pain.

Watchful waiting

Watchful waiting is a period of time during which you and your doctor watch your pelvic pain symptoms without using medical treatment.

During this period, you can keep a daily record of your symptoms and menstrual cycle and any other life events that you consider important. A watchful waiting period may last from a few days to weeks or possibly months.

Who to see

The following primary health professionals can generally evaluate and help you manage the symptoms of female pelvic pain:

For advanced treatment methods, see a gynecologist or a urologist who specializes in female pelvic disorders.

If you have ever been physically or sexually abused, that trauma may be playing a part in your pain. So you'll need to let your doctor know about the abuse. This may be hard for you, but it may be easier if you find a doctor you feel comfortable talking to.

To prepare for your appointment, see the topic Making the Most of Your Appointment.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: October 30, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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