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What Happens

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) occurs most often before age 20 and after age 40.

    • Teen years. Some teens have times of irregular vaginal bleeding. This usually gets better over time as hormone levels even out and the menstrual cycle becomes more regular. If you need treatment, your doctor may give you hormones to help regulate your menstrual cycle. He or she may also prescribe medicine to reduce bleeding.
    • Reproductive years. Some women in their 20s and 30s have abnormal uterine bleeding. Sometimes it's because of changes in hormone levels. And sometimes the reason is not known. If your doctor rules out serious causes of vaginal bleeding, he or she may diagnose you with abnormal uterine bleeding without knowing why it is happening. Your treatment depends on whether you are planning to have children.
    • After age 40: Perimenopausal and menopausal years. After age 40, women tend to have changing hormone levels. During this time before your period stops (perimenopause), you may not always ovulate. This can lead to irregular vaginal bleeding. You can expect this bleeding to go away on its own when menopause is complete. Your treatment options depend on your childbearing plans and how much your symptoms affect your daily life. Your doctor may recommend a wait-and-see approach, hormones, or a surgical procedure.

    No matter what your age, see your doctor if you have irregular vaginal bleeding.

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      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

      WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

      Last Updated: March 12, 2014
      This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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