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Thyroid Testing - Topic Overview

It is not clear whether people who do not have any risk factors and who do not have any symptoms of thyroid problems—which include an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism), thyroid nodules, and thyroid cancer—need to be screened for thyroid problems.

The American Thyroid Association recommends that all adults be tested beginning at age 35 and continuing every 5 years.1 After reviewing all of the research, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has not recommended for or against routine thyroid testing.2 Some other groups suggest that people who are at high risk—pregnant women, anyone with a personal or family history of thyroid disease, and people with other autoimmune diseases—may want to be screened. Talk to your doctor about whether you need to be tested for thyroid problems.

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People who have a family history of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) may want to have a genetic test. Before having the test, it is a good idea to talk with a genetic counselor. He or she can help you understand what your test results may mean.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: June 10, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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