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  • Question 1/15

    When your doctor presses a stethoscope to your chest, she’s listening for the:

  • Answer 1/15

    When your doctor presses a stethoscope to your chest, she’s listening for the:

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    A quick listen to the pitter-patter of your heart can give your doctor a lot of clues about your health. Steady “lub-dub” sounds are a sign of good heart health. Skipped, extra, or fluttering beats can be a symptom of possible issues from too much stress to valve problems to anemia. An irregular heartbeat is just an S.O.S., though. Your doctor will have to do more tests to give you a diagnosis.

  • Question 1/15

    Your doctor can also use a stethoscope to check the health of:

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    Your doctor can also use a stethoscope to check the health of:

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    Pressed to your back, a stethoscope can help your doctor hear your breathing. Wheezing or other concerning sounds may mean you have an infection, asthma, or other respiratory issue. Pressed to your belly, a stethoscope lets your doctor listen to your bowels. Gurgles are good: They mean air and other things are moving through your system like they should.

  • Question 1/15

    You should expect to get your first prostate exam at what age?

  • Answer 1/15

    You should expect to get your first prostate exam at what age?

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    If you’re a man with a normal risk of prostate cancer, your doctor will likely start checking your prostate, both by physical exam and blood tests, when you turn 50. If you have a family history of prostate cancer or other issues that raise your chances of it, you may start earlier, around 40 or 45.

  • Question 1/15

    One reason your doctor might tell you not to eat 8-12 hours before an exam is:

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    One reason your doctor might tell you not to eat 8-12 hours before an exam is:

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    A blood sample after you’ve fasted can tell your doctor if the amount of sugar (called glucose) in your blood is normal. A healthy range is 70-99 mg/dL. Readings higher than 99 could mean your body struggles to control your blood glucose like it should. If it's more than 125, it can mean you already have diabetes.

  • Question 1/15

    Which is not a normal body temperature for a healthy adult?

  • Answer 1/15

    Which is not a normal body temperature for a healthy adult?

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    The temperature you probably hear most as “normal” is 98.6 F, but a healthy body can range from 97.8 F to 99 F, depending on what time of day it is, whether you’ve eaten or exercised, and other things. If you’re more than 1 degree above 98.6, your doctor will call it a fever. Hypothermia starts at 95 F and under.

  • Question 1/15

    To check your pulse, a doctor or nurse may put their fingertips on your:

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    To check your pulse, a doctor or nurse may put their fingertips on your:

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    The arteries that carry your blood through your body are close to the surface at all these points. By counting how many times your artery bumps against the gentle pressure of fingertips on any of these spots, your doctor can get a read on your cardiovascular health. Normal pulse rate for adults is 60-100 beats a minute. It can vary in that range based on things like exercise, emotions, injury, and illness.

  • Question 1/15

    What does tapping your knee, triceps, or biceps with a rubber hammer tell your doctor?

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    What does tapping your knee, triceps, or biceps with a rubber hammer tell your doctor?

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    Your doctor isn’t just getting her kicks from making you kick (or jerk), she’s making sure your brain and nerves are communicating the way they should. A quick tap on your tendons can tell your doc if you have damage to your nerves or another problem like a spinal nerve compression.

  • Question 1/15

    How does your doctor check your cholesterol?

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    How does your doctor check your cholesterol?

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    You’ll usually need to fast for 9 to 12 hours before you get your blood taken for a cholesterol test (your doctor may call it a lipoprotein panel). After your blood sample comes back from a lab, they'll look at your total cholesterol number and your LDL and HDL levels. You want your LDL to be low and your HDL to be high to stay heart healthy.

  • Question 1/15

    The device that measures your blood pressure is called a:

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    The device that measures your blood pressure is called a:

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    That gauge connected to that arm cuff that squeezes your arm may have a fancy name, but it delivers important info: The pressure of blood against your arteries during a heartbeat (systolic pressure) and between heartbeats (diastolic pressure). These readings help your doctor know whether you have high blood pressure and may have greater chances of heart attack, stroke, or heart failure.

  • Question 1/15

    Women should have a Pap smear (cervical cancer test) every year.

  • Answer 1/15

    Women should have a Pap smear (cervical cancer test) every year.

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    The Pap smear -- where your doctor uses an instrument called a speculum to hold open your vagina while swabbing your cervix with a brush -- is a good way for your doctor to keep tabs on your cervical cells. But experts say every 3 years is best to keep up to date until you’re 29. After that, you can move to every 5 years, and add in a test for HPV (human papillomavirus).

  • Question 1/15

    At what age should you expect screening tests for breast cancer to start?

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    At what age should you expect screening tests for breast cancer to start?

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    At age 40, women have the choice to start having yearly mammograms (breast X-rays). Doctors recommend all women have them once they turn 45. After 55, you can switch to every 2 years.

  • Question 1/15

    Women ages 65 and older have bone scans every year to test for:

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    Women ages 65 and older have bone scans every year to test for:

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    A special X-ray of your bones, called a bone density test, can tell your doctor whether your bones are thinning out, a condition called osteoporosis. Men have a lower risk of it, so they don’t need yearly scans until age 70. You may need scans sooner if you have risk factors like you've broken a bone after age 50.

  • Question 1/15

    The color of the whites of your eyes can give your doctor clues about your liver health.

  • Answer 1/15

    The color of the whites of your eyes can give your doctor clues about your liver health.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you’re seeing yellow -- or if your doctor is -- in your eyeball, your liver could be having trouble working the way it should. This can be a sign of liver disease or infection. Your eyes can also tell your doctor if you’re having nerve issues (if your pupils don’t get smaller when your doctor shines a light in them). It can also tell them if you have other infections, like pinkeye.

  • Question 1/15

    When your doctor feels your neck, they're checking for:

  • Answer 1/15

    When your doctor feels your neck, they're checking for:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your lymph nodes help filter out viruses and bacteria. So if they’re bigger than usual, your doctor will know to look for other symptoms of infection or disease. A thyroid gland that’s bigger than usual, or has bumps that shouldn’t be there, is another clue to your doctor that it’s time to dig deeper and rule out cancer or other things.

  • Question 1/15

    During a routine exam, your doctor checks to see if your internal organs are normal by …

  • Answer 1/15

    During a routine exam, your doctor checks to see if your internal organs are normal by …

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    • Correct Answer:

    While a stethoscope can help your doctor hear if your digestive system has issues, poking and prodding with her hands can tell her if anything is swollen or doesn’t feel like it should. Plus, pushing down on your belly will tell your doctor pretty quickly if feels painful for you.

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Sources | Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on April 03, 2018 Medically Reviewed on April 03, 2018

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava, MD on
April 03, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “What Your Doc Listens for in the Stethoscope.”

Harvard Health: “Skipping a beat — the surprise of heart palpitations.”

Lehigh Valley Health Network: “What That Stethoscope Tells Your Doctor.”
American Cancer Society: “Prostate Cancer Screening FAQ,” “American Cancer Society Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cancer.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Blood Tests.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Vital Signs (Body Temperature, Pulse Rate, Respiration Rate, Blood Pressure).”

Dartmouth Medical School: “Disorders of the Nervous System: A Primer.”

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Cervical Cancer Screening.”

National Osteoporosis Foundation: “Bone Density Exam/Testing.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Head-to-Toe Checkup: Why Does My Doctor Do That?”
Mayo Clinic: “Swollen Lymph Nodes.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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