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How are ganglion cysts treated medically?

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Many cysts can disappear without any treatment at all. That said, various treatments have been proposed over the years. Some include no specific treatment other than reducing worry regarding the cyst, using a needle to remove the cyst's contents (aspiration), or surgery.

Aspiration usually includes placing a needle into the cyst, drawing the liquid material out, injecting a steroid compound (anti-inflammatory), and then splinting the wrist to keep it from moving. If you have the fluid drawn out of ganglia on the wrist 3 separate times, your possibility of being cured is between 30% and 50%. The rate of success is higher with ganglion cysts on the hand's flexor tendon sheath.

If you compare aspiration/injection and surgical removal, in general, cysts return less often after surgery.

From: Ganglion Cyst WebMD Medical Reference

Author: Elisa Aumont, MD, consulting staff, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center. Coauthor(s): Verena Valley, MD, director of ultrasound, associate professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Mississippi School of Medicine. Editors: Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM, assistant professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD, Senior Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine; Ron Fuerst, MD, clinical assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of South Carolina College of Medicine, and director, Children's Emergency Center, Children's Hospital of Richland Memorial Hospital.  




Gude, W. ,  December 2008. Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med

Ganglion Cyst from eMedicineHealth.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on October 12, 2017

Author: Elisa Aumont, MD, consulting staff, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center. Coauthor(s): Verena Valley, MD, director of ultrasound, associate professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Mississippi School of Medicine. Editors: Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM, assistant professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD, Senior Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine; Ron Fuerst, MD, clinical assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of South Carolina College of Medicine, and director, Children's Emergency Center, Children's Hospital of Richland Memorial Hospital.  




Gude, W. ,  December 2008. Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med

Ganglion Cyst from eMedicineHealth.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on October 12, 2017

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