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How can a stem cell transplant treat primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) in children?

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It's rare, but for very severe PIDD, your child could need a stem cell transplant. In some cases, it's a cure.

Stem cells come from bone marrow, which is the soft center of the bones. For a transplant, a donor supplies stem cells with unbroken genes. Your child will need to find someone who is the right match.

Close relatives are the best chance. Someone from the same racial or ethnic background may also be a good donor. If no one you know is a match, you can put your child on a waiting list.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology: "Primary Immunodeficiency Disease."

Boston Children's Hospital: "Primary Immunodeficiency."

CDC: "Newborn Screening: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency," "Severe Combined Immunodeficiency."

Children's Hospital of Wisconsin: "Bone Marrow Transplantation."

Immune Deficiency Foundation: "Patient & Family Handbook."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases."

Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network: "Learn More About Primary Immune Deficiency."

Cambridge University Hospitals: "Antibiotics for adults with primary immunodeficiency."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on September 11, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology: "Primary Immunodeficiency Disease."

Boston Children's Hospital: "Primary Immunodeficiency."

CDC: "Newborn Screening: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency," "Severe Combined Immunodeficiency."

Children's Hospital of Wisconsin: "Bone Marrow Transplantation."

Immune Deficiency Foundation: "Patient & Family Handbook."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases."

Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network: "Learn More About Primary Immune Deficiency."

Cambridge University Hospitals: "Antibiotics for adults with primary immunodeficiency."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on September 11, 2018

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What happens during a stem cell transplant treat primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) in children?

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