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How can I quench excessive thirst?

ANSWER

The answer depends on what is making you so thirsty. Drinking more water is a good place to start. But if you can't satisfy your craving for fluids, talk with your doctor.

Whatever the cause, don't just live with it. Most of the conditions that cause thirst are treatable.

SOURCES:

Popkin, B. , August 2010.  Nutrition Reviews

CDC: “Water: Meeting your Daily Fluid Needs,” “Water & Nutrition.”

Teens Health: “Dehydration.”

American Dental Association: “Dry Mouth.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Avoiding Dehydration, Proper Hydration.”

American Diabetes Association: “Diabetes Symptoms.”

UCSF Medical Center: “Diabetes Insipidus.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Dehydration and Heat Stroke,” “Diabetes Insipidus.”

National Institutes of Health: “Your Guide to Anemia.”

Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation: “Dry mouth: A Hallmark Symptom of Sjogren’s Syndrome.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on September 23, 2019

SOURCES:

Popkin, B. , August 2010.  Nutrition Reviews

CDC: “Water: Meeting your Daily Fluid Needs,” “Water & Nutrition.”

Teens Health: “Dehydration.”

American Dental Association: “Dry Mouth.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Avoiding Dehydration, Proper Hydration.”

American Diabetes Association: “Diabetes Symptoms.”

UCSF Medical Center: “Diabetes Insipidus.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Dehydration and Heat Stroke,” “Diabetes Insipidus.”

National Institutes of Health: “Your Guide to Anemia.”

Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation: “Dry mouth: A Hallmark Symptom of Sjogren’s Syndrome.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on September 23, 2019

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What are the symptoms of dehydration?

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