PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can keeping a checklist help me take my medicine?

ANSWER

A written chart that shows which medications to take and when to take them is another good way to stay organized. You can find them online or make your own.

Include the name of the medicine, the dose, when you take it, and what the pill looks like. Also mark any special instructions, such as whether it should be taken with food.

Leave space to check off that you've taken each dose. Update your drug list as soon as you change prescriptions.

From: How to Organize Your Medications WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Administration on Aging: "Prescription Drug Options for Older Adults: Managing Your Medicines," "Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults."

Visiting Nurse Service of New York: "5 Tips for Managing Medications."

American Lung Association: "Managing Your COPD Medications."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Puzzled by Pills? Tips for Medication Management."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Medication Management Tips."

The University of Iowa College of Public Health: "Managing Your Medications."

Charles Krobot, PharmD, assistant professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.

Hedgecock, S. , May 4, 2015. Forbes

University of Michigan: "Tips for Managing Your Medications."

Dayer, L.  , March-April, 2013. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association

NIH Senior Health: "Taking Charge of Your Medicines."

National Council on Patient Information and Education Must for Seniors: "6 Ways to Help Your Older Parents Use Medications the Right Way and Prevent Problems."

FDA: "My Medicine Record," "Are You Taking Medication as Prescribed?"

Health in Aging: "Avoiding Overmedication and Harmful Drug Reactions."

Medicare.gov: "Medication Therapy Management programs for complex health needs."

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Administration on Aging: "Prescription Drug Options for Older Adults: Managing Your Medicines," "Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults."

Visiting Nurse Service of New York: "5 Tips for Managing Medications."

American Lung Association: "Managing Your COPD Medications."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Puzzled by Pills? Tips for Medication Management."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Medication Management Tips."

The University of Iowa College of Public Health: "Managing Your Medications."

Charles Krobot, PharmD, assistant professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.

Hedgecock, S. , May 4, 2015. Forbes

University of Michigan: "Tips for Managing Your Medications."

Dayer, L.  , March-April, 2013. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association

NIH Senior Health: "Taking Charge of Your Medicines."

National Council on Patient Information and Education Must for Seniors: "6 Ways to Help Your Older Parents Use Medications the Right Way and Prevent Problems."

FDA: "My Medicine Record," "Are You Taking Medication as Prescribed?"

Health in Aging: "Avoiding Overmedication and Harmful Drug Reactions."

Medicare.gov: "Medication Therapy Management programs for complex health needs."

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 11, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What's the first thing your doctor does in case of rejection with your organ transplant?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: