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How do doctors diagnose and treat UTIs?

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If you think you might have a urinary tract infection, you’ll tell your doctor about your symptoms and start with a urine test. A urinalysis checks your urine sample for white blood cells, blood, and bacteria. A urine culture is another test that can find the type of bacteria that caused the infection, which will help your doctor choose an antibiotic to give you. If you tend to get UTIs often, or if you’re a man, your doctor may want to see if something is blocking the flow of your urine or if your pee is going the wrong way back up through your urinary system. In that case, you may get tests such as:

  • Blood tests
  • X-rays, CT scans, MRIs, or ultrasound to show your urinary tract
  • Cystoscopy, in which your doctor inserts a long, thin instrument into your urethra (the tube that carries urine out of your body from your bladder) to check inside your urinary tract
  • Intravenous pyelogram, an X-ray test that uses dye so your doctor can better see your urinary system

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

American Academy of Family Physicians.

WomensHealth.gov: “Urinary tract infection fact sheet.”

The Urology Institute.

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection.”

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on April 17, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

American Academy of Family Physicians.

WomensHealth.gov: “Urinary tract infection fact sheet.”

The Urology Institute.

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection.”

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on April 17, 2018

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What are symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

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