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How do you prevent a heat stroke?

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When the heat index is high, it's best to stay inside where it's air-conditioned. If you must go outdoors:

  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing, and a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more.
  • Drink extra fluids.
  • Drink 24 ounces of fluid two hours before you exercise or work outside. While you’re out, drink 8 ounces of water every 20 minutes, even if you aren’t thirsty.
  • Reschedule or cancel outdoor activity. Or go out when it’s coolest, either early morning or after sunset.

SOURCES:

Familydoctor.org: "Heat Exhaustion and Heatstroke. What causes heat exhaustion and heatstroke?"

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Heat Injury and Heat Exhaustion."

CDC: "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Extreme Heat." 

National Institute on Aging: "Hyperthermia: Too Hot for Your Health."  

U.S. Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency: "Are You Ready? Extreme Heat." 

News release, The Endocrine Society.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on November 25, 2018

SOURCES:

Familydoctor.org: "Heat Exhaustion and Heatstroke. What causes heat exhaustion and heatstroke?"

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: "Heat Injury and Heat Exhaustion."

CDC: "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Extreme Heat." 

National Institute on Aging: "Hyperthermia: Too Hot for Your Health."  

U.S. Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency: "Are You Ready? Extreme Heat." 

News release, The Endocrine Society.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on November 25, 2018

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What happens after you have heat stroke?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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