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How is a catheter used during hemodialysis?

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A catheter may work for you if you need to start hemodialysis very quickly. A flexible tube is put into a vein in your neck, below your collarbone, or next to your groin. It’s only meant to be used for a short time.

During hemodialysis, you’ll sit or lie back in a chair. A tech will place two needles in your arm where the fistula or graft is located. A pump in the hemodialysis machine slowly draws out your blood, then sends it through another machine called a dialyzer. This works like a kidney and filters out extra salt, waste, and fluid. Your cleaned blood is sent back into your body through the second needle in your arm. Or, if there’s a catheter, blood comes out of one port and then is returned via a second port.

You can have hemodialysis in a hospital, a dialysis treatment center, or at home. If you have it in a center, the sessions last 3 to 5 hours, and you’ll likely only need them three times a week. If you have hemodialysis at home, you’ll need treatments 6 or 7 days for 2 to 3 hours each time.

Some people read or watch TV during treatment. If you have hemodialysis at home, you may be able to do it at night while you sleep.

From: When Do I Need Dialysis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Your Kidneys and How They Work,” “Dialysis,” “Choosing Not to Treat With Dialysis or Transplant,” “Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Hemodialysis.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Dialysis,” “Hemodialysis,” “Coping With the Top 5 Side Effects of Dialysis,” Filtering Dialysis Myths From Facts,” “Dialysis: Deciding to Stop.”

Texas Heart Institute: “Vascular Access for Hemodialysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hemodialysis,” “Peritoneal Dialysis.”

University of Wisconsin Health: “Kidney Failure: When Should I Start Dialysis?”

American Kidney Fund: “Peritoneal Dialysis (PD).”

American Journal of Kidney Disease : “Fatigue in Patients Receiving Maintenance Dialysis: A Review of Definitions, Measures and Contributing Factors.”

CDC: “Dialysis Safety: Patient Overview.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 21, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Your Kidneys and How They Work,” “Dialysis,” “Choosing Not to Treat With Dialysis or Transplant,” “Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Hemodialysis.”

National Kidney Foundation: “Dialysis,” “Hemodialysis,” “Coping With the Top 5 Side Effects of Dialysis,” Filtering Dialysis Myths From Facts,” “Dialysis: Deciding to Stop.”

Texas Heart Institute: “Vascular Access for Hemodialysis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Hemodialysis,” “Peritoneal Dialysis.”

University of Wisconsin Health: “Kidney Failure: When Should I Start Dialysis?”

American Kidney Fund: “Peritoneal Dialysis (PD).”

American Journal of Kidney Disease : “Fatigue in Patients Receiving Maintenance Dialysis: A Review of Definitions, Measures and Contributing Factors.”

CDC: “Dialysis Safety: Patient Overview.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 21, 2018

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