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How is acquired autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) treated?

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If you have a disease that’s causing your anemia, your doctor will treat. If a medicine is the cause, you'll likely have to stop taking it. If your AIHA is mild, you may not need treatment.

Doctors usually first prescribe steroids to stop your immune system from attacking your red blood cells. Then surgery to remove the spleen and a medicine called rituximab may be ordered. And other medicines can be used to suppress the immune system.

Blood transfusions may be needed in some cases.

From: Acquired Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 15, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 09/15/2018

SOURCES:

American Association of Clinical Chemistry: "Hemolytic Anemias."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "How is Hemolytic Anemia Diagnosed?" "Types of Hemolytic Anemia," "What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemolytic Anemia?"  "What Is Anemia?"

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Anemia, Hemolytic, Acquired Autoimmune."

Orphanet: "Autoimmune hemolytic anemia."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 15, 2018

SOURCES:

American Association of Clinical Chemistry: "Hemolytic Anemias."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "How is Hemolytic Anemia Diagnosed?" "Types of Hemolytic Anemia," "What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemolytic Anemia?"  "What Is Anemia?"

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Anemia, Hemolytic, Acquired Autoimmune."

Orphanet: "Autoimmune hemolytic anemia."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 15, 2018

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