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How is acute kidney failure treated?

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If there aren’t any other problems, the kidneys may heal themselves.

In most other cases, acute kidney failure can be treated if it’s caught early. It may involve changes to your diet, the use of medications, or even dialysis.

  • Diet. Your doctor will limit the amount of salt and potassium you can take in until your kidneys heal. That’s because both of these substances are removed from your body through your kidneys. Changing how and what you eat won’t reverse acute kidney failure. But your doctor may modify your diet while he deals with the conditions that caused it. This may mean treating a health problem like heart failure, taking you off certain medications, or giving you fluids through an IV if you’re dehydrated.
  • Drugs. Your doctor may prescribe medicines that regulate the amount of phosphorous and potassium in your blood. When your kidneys fail, they can’t remove these substances from your body. Medications won’t help your kidneys, but they may reduce some of the problems kidney failure causes.
  • Dialysis . If you have acute kidney failure, your doctor will most likely recommend hemodialysis. In this procedure, you’re hooked up to a machine that cleans your blood. If the cause of your kidney failure is treated and the organs recover, you may only need hemodialysis for a short time. If not, you’ll need it permanently.

From: What is Acute Kidney Failure? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Kidney Fund: “Kidney Failure/ESRD.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Failure.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acute Kidney Failure.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Disease: What to Expect.”

Merck Manuals: “Acute Kidney Injury.”

University of New Mexico health Sciences Center: “Electrolyte Imbalance.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 23, 2018

SOURCES:

American Kidney Fund: “Kidney Failure/ESRD.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Failure.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acute Kidney Failure.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Kidney Disease: What to Expect.”

Merck Manuals: “Acute Kidney Injury.”

University of New Mexico health Sciences Center: “Electrolyte Imbalance.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 23, 2018

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What is renal (kidney) failure?

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