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How is elephantiasis diagnosed?

ANSWER

This is a very rare condition that’s spread by mosquitos. Your doctor will examine you and take your medical history. They make ask if you’ve traveled to a place where you were more likely to have gotten elephantiasis.

Your doctor also will order blood tests to check for roundworms that cause the disease. These tests need to be done at night, because that’s when these parasites are active.

SOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “Mosquito Bite Prevention for Travelers.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Elephantiasis.”

World Health Organization: “Lymphatic filariasis.”

CDC: “Parasites: Lymphatic filariasis.”  

Stanford University: “Lymphatic filariasis: Prevention and Treatment.”

 

 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 09, 2018

SOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “Mosquito Bite Prevention for Travelers.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Elephantiasis.”

World Health Organization: “Lymphatic filariasis.”

CDC: “Parasites: Lymphatic filariasis.”  

Stanford University: “Lymphatic filariasis: Prevention and Treatment.”

 

 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 09, 2018

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What are treatments for elephantiasis?

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