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How should you take peppermint oil capsules to avoid side effects?

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Although enteric-coated peppermint oil capsules may reduce the risk of heartburn, their protective coating can break down more quickly and increase the risk of heartburn when taken at the same time as prescription and over-the-counter medications that decrease stomach acid and which are often used for heartburn or acid reflux. It's best to take such drugs at least two hours after taking enteric-coated peppermint oil products. A stomach condition called achlorhydria, in which the stomach doesn't produce hydrochloric acid, also may hasten the coating's breakdown. So people with the condition are advised against using peppermint oil.

From: Peppermint Oil WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Herbs at a Glance: Peppermint Oil,” “Irritable Bowel Syndrome and CAM: At a Glance.” 

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database: “Peppermint.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on July 26, 2017

SOURCES: 

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Herbs at a Glance: Peppermint Oil,” “Irritable Bowel Syndrome and CAM: At a Glance.” 

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database: “Peppermint.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on July 26, 2017

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